Proclamations, October 2, 1981

Proclamation 4866 -- American Enterprise Day

October 2, 1981

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

One of America's great strengths is its private enterprise system. The personal and economic freedom enjoyed by our people turned our fledgling nation, in a few short years, into an economic dynamo that astounded the world.

Today, the unique blend of individual opportunity, incentive and reward that is the free enterprise system provides Americans with an unparalleled standard of living.

As the foundation of our economic life, free enterprise depends on and serves every American. It is the enemy of poverty. It permits Americans to be the most compassionate of people, at home and to those in need abroad.

Through their insistence on the free enterprise system, our forefathers unleashed the creative energies of a people, built the foundation of our unparalleled political and economic freedom, and brought forth a vital force in the world.

In recognition of the importance of our free enterprise system, the Congress has, in Senate Joint Resolution 78, designated October 2, 1981, as American Enterprise Day.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim October 2, 1981, as American Enterprise Day. I urge all Americans to observe this occasion with appropriate activities, and in particular to encourage in our youth an appreciation and enthusiasm for the role of free enterprise in our nation's life.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this second day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and sixth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:05 p.m., October 2, 1981]

Proclamation 4867 -- National Port Week

October 2, 1981

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Much of our history as a nation has been shaped by the ports of our sea coasts and inland waterways. Our early harbors fostered industry and trade and helped build many of America's great cities.

Today, our ports are an important resource in the Nation's economy. In 1980, the port industry handled almost two billion short tons of waterborne commerce in foreign and domestic trade. This commerce contributed over $35 billion to the gross national product and generated an additional $1.5 billion in services sold to users.

Recognizing their vital importance to America's economic health, State and local port authorities and private industry have continued to invest financial resources to improve port facilities to meet ever-increasing needs.

The growing demand for coal and other energy sources to fuel the economic growth of the United States and the rest of the industrialized world has presented the ports of this Nation with a unique challenge.

Many port authorities have begun and others have plans for the construction or expansion of harbor facilities. Some 70 million tons of annual capacity now under construction will result in a 50 percent increase over current capacity. By 1985 total investment in new or expanded facilities is expected to meet the projected demand of our industrial trading partners and to decrease our dependence on foreign oil.

In recognition of the importance of our ports to the Nation's economy, the Congress has, by Senate Joint Resolution 103, designated the week beginning October 4, 1981, as National Port Week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the seven calendar days beginning October 4, 1981, as National Port Week. I invite the Governors of the several States, the chief officials of local governments, and the people of the United States to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this second day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and sixth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:06 p.m., October 2, 1981]

Proclamation 4868 -- National Employ the Handicapped Week, 1981

October 2, 1981

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Communities across the land have formed partnerships -- between disabled and non-disabled, labor and industry, employers and employees -- to assure that disabled people might share fully in the American dream. There is a real need for such partnerships and for these ties to continue and expand.

Employers throughout the country are opening their doors to qualified disabled workers. This is happening not just because of existing laws, but because disabled men and women have been establishing such fine work records. Yet not all employers have opened their doors equally wide. We must therefore continue our efforts to find more and better jobs for people with disabilities.

Gains have also been made in education, training, housing, transportation and accessibility. We need to make the 1980s years in which disabled individuals achieve the greatest possible access to our society, maximum independence, and full opportunity to develop and use their capabilities.

The Congress, by joint resolution of August 11, 1945, as amended (36 U.S.C. 155), has called for the designation of the first full week in October each year as National Employ the Handicapped Week. Recognition of this special week presents the opportunity to dedicate ourselves to meeting the goal of expanded opportunity for disabled Americans.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week beginning October 4, 1981, as National Employ the Handicapped Week. I urge all Governors, Mayors, other public officials, leaders in business and labor, and private citizens to help meet the challenge of the future in which all disabled Americans will participate fully in our country's many opportunities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this second day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and sixth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:38 p.m., October 2, 1981]