Proclamations, April 14, 1981

Proclamation 4835 -- Import Quota on Peanuts

April 14, 1981

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

By Proclamation No. 4807 of December 4, 1980, the quantity of certain peanuts permitted entry into the customs territory of the United States during a quota year was increased 200 million pounds on a temporary and emergency basis.

The increase of quantity was to be effective pending further action; specifically, after receipt of a report of findings and recommendations of the United States International Trade Commission, which was scheduled to conduct an investigation into this matter pursuant to section 22 of the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1933, as amended (7 U.S.C. 624). The Commission has conducted an investigation and reported its findings and recommendations.

On the basis of the Commission's investigation and report, I find and declare that through July 31, 1981, the entry of 300 million pounds of peanuts -- which would otherwise be under the terms and conditions specified in item 951.01 of part 3 of the Appendix to the Tariff Schedules of the United States -- in addition to the quota quantity specified for such peanuts in item 951.00 of part 3 of the Appendix to the Tariff Schedules of the United States, will not render or tend to render ineffective, or materially interfere with, the price support operations now being conducted by the Department of Agriculture for peanuts, or reduce substantially the amount of any product processed in the United States from domestic peanuts with respect to which such program is now being undertaken.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, by the authority vested in me by section 22 of the Agricultural Adjustment Act, as amended, do hereby proclaim: that item 951.01 of part 3 of the Appendix to the Tariff Schedules of the United States, as added by Proclamation No. 4807, is hereby amended by changing the figure ``200 million'' to read ``300 million'' and by changing the date ``June 30, 1981'' to read ``July 13, 1981''; and, that section (2) of Proclamation No. 4807 is amended by changing ``July 1, 1981'' to read ``August 1, 1981.''

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred eighty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred fifth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11 a.m., April 15, 1981]

Proclamation 4836 -- Loyalty Day, 1981

April 14, 1981

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

One of the great treasures of America is the unity of its people. No nation is composed of citizens with such diverse cultural, racial and religious backgrounds as is the United States of America. And while the unique contributions of each segment of our population are important, the significant fact remains that each of us, whatever background, remains loyal to the Nation and to the ideals of freedom for which it stands.

Throughout our history, all Americans have toiled together to build this land into the freest and most prosperous Nation on earth. And when the times required it, our people stood shoulder-to-shoulder proclaiming to any in the world who would threaten, that all were Americans and proud of it.

Seldom are we called upon to consciously consider and express loyalty to our Nation and its ideals of liberty. It would be well to do so. The world is filled with tyranny and deprivation. Each of us can thank God that we are living in this blessed land. And when differences arise among us, which is only natural in a free society, we should always remain aware that we are one people, together and indivisible.

As we strive to solve the problems confronting us, it is appropriate to stop for a moment and reflect upon our national institutions, our heritage of freedom and what it means to be an American.

To encourage such reflection, a joint resolution of the Congress was enacted on July 18, 1958 (72 Stat. 369, 36 U.S.C. 162), designating the first day of May of each year as Loyalty Day, and requesting that the President issue an annual proclamation inviting public observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, call upon all Americans and upon patriotic, civic, and educational organizations to observe Friday, May 1, 1981, as Loyalty Day, with appropriate ceremonies.

I call upon officials of the Government to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings and grounds on that day in testimony of our loyalty.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred eighty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fifth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 2:44 p.m., April 15, 1981]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on April 15.