Proclamations, September 28, 1981

Proclamation 4860 -- Fire Prevention Week

September 28, 1981

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Every year this Nation experiences needless loss of life and property. America's fire losses are a great waste of our precious resources and must be minimized. Destruction of property and what we pay for fire protection totals over $21 billion each year. But even worse, 7,500 American deaths annually can be attributed to fire.

With a concerted effort by individual citizens, our Nation can curtail its needless fire losses.

Installing and properly maintaining smoke detectors and practicing fire escape plans can reduce loss of life and property. If each of us would take a few simple precautions, fewer Americans would suffer disfigurement, the agony of injury, or the mental anguish of the sudden loss of loved ones.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do designate the week of October 4 through October 10, 1981, as Fire Prevention Week.

Furthermore, I congratulate the fire service for their fire prevention efforts and support their continued work. The National Fire Protection Association, the Fire Marshals Association of North America, fire chiefs, and fire fighters deserve our thanks for their sponsorship of this year's fire safety observance.

I direct the Federal Emergency Management Agency to work with all levels of government, industry, service organizations and volunteers to encourage the broadest possible use of smoke detectors across the Nation.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 28th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and sixth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:02 p.m., September 29, 1981]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on September 29.

Proclamation 4861 -- National Diabetes Week

September 28, 1981

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Diabetes is a serious and widespread public health problem, resulting from the inability of the body to convert nutrients into energy. This debilitating and often fatal disease affects about 10 million Americans and is occurring among all age and socio-economic groups at an increasing rate. More than 35,000 people die from diabetes every year, and the disease contributes to deaths from heart attack, stroke, kidney failure and blood vessel disorders. It is the leading cause of new blindness. The cost of diabetes is measured in the billions of dollars, but by far the highest price is paid in the suffering and shortened life span of its victims.

Fortunately, there is hope. Through advances in medical research, we are learning more about diabetes, its cause, and improved methods for its control and management. Prospects for better prevention and treatment appear brighter than at any time since the discovery of insulin more than 50 years ago.

I am pleased that in cooperation with private, voluntary organizations, the Federal Government plays a valuable role in support of this research. It is my fervent hope that continued efforts will improve the quality of life for all our Nation's diabetics and eventually lead to the prevention and cure of this difficult and cruel disease.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning October 4 through October 10, 1981, as National Diabetes Week, and I call upon the people of the United States to observe that week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-eighth day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and sixth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:03 p.m., September 29, 1981]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on September 29.

Proclamation 4862 -- Child Health Day

September 28, 1981

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

We have all heard the saying, ``As the twig is bent the tree inclines.'' This maxim is especially true for the minds and bodies of our children. The physical and mental health of the child prepares the way for the physical and mental health of the adult.

Our future as a Nation lies in the healthy development of our children. That development must be fostered from the earliest stages so that our twigs and saplings will grow into straight and strong trees.

We must actively promote child health through the positive approach of preventive care, such as early prenatal care for mothers, assured immunization against dangerous childhood illnesses and early identification of handicapping conditions.

In this effort to improve the well-being and future of our children, I earnestly call for cooperative and voluntary action from all those who make maternal and child health their profession, from the States through their health care resources, from the organizations of private citizens who devote themselves to the health of mothers and children, and particularly from parents themselves, whose attention to their children's needs and personal examples of healthful behavior are vital factors in the protection of child health.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, pursuant to a joint resolution of May 18, 1928, as amended (36 U.S.C. 143), do hereby proclaim Monday, October 5, 1981, as Child Health Day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 28th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and sixth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:04 p.m., September 29, 1981]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on September 29.

Proclamation 4863 -- White Cane Safety Day

September 28, 1981

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

For blind Americans, the white cane is an important sign of independence, symbolizing their ability to travel in our Nation's cities and towns with great confidence and safety. For motorists, the white cane symbolizes caution, and reminds them that their courtesy and consideration insure the safety of the visually disabled.

We should always be aware of the significance of the white cane and extend every courtesy to those who carry it. By doing so, we will respect and ensure the right to independence of the visually disabled as they pursue a productive and fulfilling life.

In recognition of the significance of the white cane, the Congress, by a joint resolution of October 6, 1964 (78 Stat. 1003), authorized the President to proclaim October 15 of each year as White Cane Safety Day.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim October 15, 1981, as White Cane Safety Day.

I urge all Americans to mark this occasion by giving greater consideration to the special needs of the visually disabled, and, particularly, to observe White Cane Safety Day with activities that contribute to maximum independent use of our streets and public facilities by our visually handicapped population.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 28th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and sixth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:05 p.m., September 29, 1981]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on September 29.

Proclamation 4864 -- United Nations Day, 1981

September 28, 1981

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The United Nations rose from the ashes of the Second World War. As we observe another United Nations Day on October 24, 1981, we are thankful that the world has since been spared another major conflagration.

The United Nations has assisted in bringing stability to troubled areas and will surely do so again. United Nations peacekeeping forces are on duty in the volatile Middle East and have contributed to maintaining the peace in other places.

The problems addressed in this world forum are diverse, and the United Nations cannot resolve all matters it considers. But it has helped. This year it held a major conference for the purpose of pledging assistance to refugees in Africa. The United States made a substantial pledge, consistent with our historic support for United Nations refugee programs.

The United Nations is the world's meeting place. It brings together representatives of virtually all countries to discuss a multitude of subjects. These meetings afford opportunities for bilateral discussions, often at a high level, as an extra benefit. Today, much of the world's diplomacy takes place under the aegis of the United Nations.

The United States will continue to play a prominent role and champion the values and ideals that originally inspired the United Nations. We will further those activities that strengthen the capacity of the institution to serve the good of mankind.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Saturday, October 24, 1981, as United Nations Day. I urge all Americans to use this day as an opportunity to better acquaint themselves with the activities and accomplishments of the United Nations.

I have appointed Mr. Robert Anderson to serve as 1981 United States National Chairman for United Nations Day, and welcome the role of the United Nations Association of the United States of America in working with him to celebrate this special day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 28th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and sixth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:06 p.m., September 29, 1981]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on September 29.