Proclamations, October 12, 1982

Proclamation 4984 -- National Port Week, 1982

October 12, 1982

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Ocean, Great Lakes, and inland river ports and terminals are among our most important national assets. They have contributed substantially to the shaping of our early history as a Nation and fostered the industry and trade which helped build many of America's great cities.

Today our ports are vital links in the total transportation system which serves this Nation's domestic and international trade. Their continued development is indispensable to our economic and military security. In 1981 port industry handled over two billion short tons of waterborne commerce in foreign and domestic trade; added $6.5 billion to the United States Treasury from U.S. Customs Service collections; and contributed over $35 billion to the gross national product and over $1.5 billion to the balance of payments accounts.

To meet the needs of expanding waterborne commerce, billions of dollars have been invested in new and expanded facilities by non-Federal entities representing State and local authorities and private industry.

In recognition of the importance of our ports to the Nation's economy, security, and welfare, the Congress has, by Joint Resolution, designated the first week in October 1982 as ``National Port Week.''

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the seven calendar days beginning October 3, 1982, as ``National Port Week.'' I invite the Governors of the several States, the chief officials of local governments, and the people of the United States to observe this with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 1:22 p.m., October 12, 1982]

Proclamation 4985 -- National Newspaper Carrier Appreciation Day

October 12, 1982

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Every day nearly 100 million Americans read a newspaper that has been delivered to their homes by a newspaper carrier. The estimated one million newspaper carriers in our Nation, the great majority of whom are 18 years of age or younger, perform an essential service in the dissemination of information that is so vital to the functioning of a free society.

In all kinds of weather, and often in hours of darkness, these young people make their appointed rounds. Most of them are engaged in their first venture in American enterprise, their initiative and devoted efforts enhancing the quality of life in our Nation.

In recognition of the contribution of newpaper carriers in our society, the Congress of the United States has, by Senate Joint Resolution 239, designated October 16, 1982, as National Newspaper Carrier Appreciation Day.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate October 16, 1982, as National Newspaper Carrier Appreciation Day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 12th day of Oct. in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:14 a.m., October 13, 1982]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on October 13.

Proclamation 4986 -- National Farm-City Week, 1982

October 12, 1982

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Each year our hardworking farmers produce enough food and fiber to feed and clothe the people of America as well as those of many other countries. This nation is indeed fortunate to be blessed with such a productive farming system.

Many of our fellow countrymen, however, have had little exposure to the miracle of American agriculture -- fewer than three percent of the nation's people feed and clothe the other ninety-seven percent. Caught up in the fast pace of urban life, city dwellers often take for granted the quiet and efficient regularity with which their rural counterparts sustain an entire population with such a plentiful supply of food and fiber.

Our future as a prosperous nation depends on our ability to keep a large number of interrelated parts working in harmony. Our farms and cities are inextricably connected by a great marketing chain of producers, transporters, processors, warehousemen, wholesalers, retailers, and consumers. This free market process will remain viable as long as its various links are strong enough to make their contributions to moving goods and services where they are needed. As the anchor points of this chain, farmers and city dwellers are absolutely crucial to each other.

To achieve a deeper appreciation of the interdependence of farms and cities, we set aside each November a Farm-City Week during which we call attention to the farmer-city dweller partnership which has contributed so much to the vitality and prosperity of our nation.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the period November 19 through November 25, 1982, as National Farm-City Week. I call on all Americans, those in rural areas and those in cities, to join in recognizing the accomplishments of our productive farm families and of our urban residents in working together in a spirit of cooperation and interdependence to create bounty, wealth, and strength for the nation.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 12th day of Oct., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:15 a.m., October 13, 1982]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on October 13.