Remarks Following a Meeting With President Roberto Suazo Cordova of Honduras in San Pedro Sula

December 4, 1982

President Suazo and I have just completed a very useful exchange of ideas on the full range of bilateral issues and regional problems that confront our two democracies. In this, our second meeting this year, we have continued the close consultation that we began in Washington last July. This has given our dialog continuity and enabled us to analyze these problems in greater detail.

I have expressed my administration's support and my nation's admiration for President Suazo's efforts to ensure, for the Honduran people, the benefits of a democratic government elected on the principles of the rule of law. President Suazo has made it clear to me that there will be no retreat from that noble principle.

We are in agreement that we must work together to oppose those who seek to disrupt the promise of economic progress and political stability that is the legacy of peace in the Americas. My administration is convinced that through cooperation and solidarity, our governments can protect our democratic institutions and free-market economic systems from the counterfeit revolutionaries who seek to destroy growth and impose totalitarianism on free people.

We will cooperate in every way we can with Honduras and the other democratic governments of Central America to further our common objectives.

It's a pleasure to be here, and our only regret is that it has to be such a very short visit. But, again, we're grateful to the President, the people of Honduras for giving us this opportunity to visit with them.

Note: The President spoke at 5:15 p.m. to reporters assembled in Hangar 3, near the headquarters building of an Air Force base where he and President Suazo and their delegations had met.

Earlier in the afternoon, President Reagan was accorded a welcoming ceremony at La Mesa International Airport.

As printed above, this item follows the transcript released by the Office of the Press Secretary.