Proclamation 4924 -- World Trade Week, 1982

April 5, 1982

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The United States recognizes two of its most important responsibilities -- to help restore growth and vitality to the world economy and to assure that all countries participate fully in international development. That is why America is committed to policies of free trade, unrestricted investment and open capital markets.

We also recognize that the international economic system can expand and improve only on a foundation of sound domestic policies in all countries. That is why this Administration is working so diligently to promote the economic well-being of the United States.

A vital interlocking part of our economy is our export activity. Every billion dollars in manufactured exports provides some 32,000 jobs for American workers. Exports account for almost six million U.S. jobs and generate billions of dollars in business for U.S. companies. Small wonder that this year's World Trade Week theme is ``exports mean jobs.''

For these reasons, the United States remains firmly committed to a liberal world trading system and an active role in future world trade negotiations. In such negotiations, the United States adheres to the principle of reciprocal trade concessions and commitments -- a principle embodied in the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade that has served the mutual interests of all trading partners.

Government can set the framework for expanded trade, but government cannot make trade flourish. This enormous power lies with private enterprise. When American private citizens act to increase trade, all America will benefit.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning May 16, 1982, as World Trade Week, and I invite the people of the United States to join in ceremonies affirming that trade is essential to our well-being at home and abroad.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 5th day of April in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and sixth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:35 p.m., April 5, 1982]