Proclamations

Proclamation 4968 -- Child Health Day, 1982

September 14, 1982

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

There is no better way for this Nation to invest in its future than by fostering the health of its children. We can best do this by encouraging children to develop good health habits and attitudes and by giving them the protection of immunization. Good health habits and practices begun in childhood are the prelude to positive health throughout life.

Healthy children foreshadow vigorous adults whose communities will benefit from their energy and productivity. All of us should know how the personal choices we make can help prevent disease and promote good health and to transfer this knowledge to our children. By working together, parents, schools, private and voluntary organizations, and government can effect a beneficial and lasting change in the health of our Nation and the lives of our children.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, pursuant to a joint resolution of May 18, 1928, as amended (36 U.S.C. 143), do hereby proclaim Monday, October 4, 1982, as Child Health Day.

I urge all Americans to join me in encouraging good health habits and attitudes in our children and call upon all citizens to observe Child Health Day with appropriate activities directed toward establishing such practices in the youth of our Country.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 14th day of Sept. in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:07 a.m., September 15, 1982]

Proclamation 4969 -- General Pulaski Memorial Day, 1982

September 14, 1982

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Two hundred and three years ago the Polish and American patriot General Casimir Pulaski fell at the battle of Savannah while fighting for the principles of freedom and equality in our young Nation's struggle for independence. His example of dedication to democratic ideals has provided continuing inspiration to all of us. His name and deeds remain alive in the hearts of the Polish people, never more so than in this difficult time when so many of their basic rights are being denied to them.

In remembrance of General Pulaski's heroic sacrifice and his dedication to the ideals of freedom, we pay tribute to him and to the Polish nation of which he was such an esteemed son. In doing so, we also honor the contributions made by generations of Polish-Americans to the greatness of America.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Monday, October 11, 1982, as General Pulaski Memorial Day, and I direct the appropriate Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 14th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:20 p.m., September 15, 1982]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on September 15.

Proclamation 4970 -- United Nations Day, 1982

September 14, 1982

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The United Nations was born out of the massive human suffering and destruction caused by the Second World War. From the outset, the United States, one of the principal architects and founders of the United Nations, has worked to make it a forum for debate among all peace-loving nations and to support its purpose of preventing war and conflict through conciliation and cooperation. Because that goal has not been fully achieved and because the U.N. has been misused, today's world is too often fraught with strife, division, and conflict. But, despite the abuse and shortcomings, the United Nations can still be instrumental in facilitating and overseeing agreements to end conflict, in providing a center for reducing tensions through dialogue and debate, and in addressing the problems of underdevelopment which can spur conflict.

Americans can take pride in having provided significant moral, political, and financial support for the United Nations since its inception. That support will be maintained and the United States will continue to play a prominent role in the organization, using it to champion the values and ideals which underlie our own society and which originally helped to inspire the formation of the United Nations.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Sunday, October 24, 1982, as United Nations Day. On this day I urge all Americans to better acquaint themselves with the activities and accomplishments of the United Nations.

I have appointed Robert Anderson to serve as 1982 United States National Chairman for United Nations Day and welcome the role of the United Nations Association of the United States of America in working with him to celebrate this special day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 14th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:21 p.m., September 15, 1982]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on September 15.

Proclamation 4971 -- National Disabled Veterans Week, 1982

September 14, 1982

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

As we strive to improve our military preparedness to further our goals of a lasting peace and freedom, we look for special inspiration to our disabled veterans who have so nobly sacrificed for these ideals. Few others have so fully demonstrated great courage or endured such hardships for their country and the cause of liberty.

All Americans owe a great debt of gratitude to the over two million service-disabled veterans. The immense personal adversity suffered by these our fellow countrymen is incalculable in terms of diminished health, lost career opportunities, and restricted personal fulfillment. We are also keenly aware of the substantial tragedy these injuries pose for the families of these veterans who, along with their loved ones, must shoulder the weight of this burden.

The important contributions to the national welfare made by these gallant men and women, not only in their military service but also in their later civilian activities, are a source of pride and admiration to each of us and serve as an illuminating lesson in valor and fortitude.

It is most fitting that Congress has chosen to recognize this record of distinguished service, courage, and accomplishment through passage of a joint resolution authorizing designation of ``National Disabled Veterans Week.''

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week beginning November 7, 1982, as National Disabled Veterans Week. I call upon all Americans to join in honoring those who have given so much in the defense of freedom. I ask Government agencies at all levels, and private organizations and individuals to observe this week with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 14th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:22 p.m., September 15, 1982]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on September 15.