Proclamations, September 24, 1982

Proclamation 4976 -- National Sewing Month

September 24, 1982

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Tens of millions of Americans sew at home. Their efforts demonstrate the industry, the skill and the self-reliance which are so characteristic of this Nation.

In recognition of the importance of home sewing to our economy the Congress has, by Senate Joint Resolution 205, designated September, 1982, as National Sewing Month.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim September, 1982, as National Sewing Month. I call upon the people of the United States to observe this month with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 24th day of Sept. in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:48 a.m., September 27, 1982]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on September 25.

Proclamation 4977 -- National Cystic Fibrosis Week, 1982

September 24, 1982

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

In our country today there are approximately 20,000 to 30,000 young people afflicted with cystic fibrosis -- a genetic disease that will prevent most of them from reaching full adulthood. Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal genetic disease that strikes American children; its cause and cure are still a mystery, and its effects pose formidable obstacles to normal activity throughout its victims' brief lives.

In the past twenty-five years, medical research has achieved measurable success in treating the symptoms of cystic fibrosis and in extending the lives of children born with the disease. The promise of further advances and the courage demonstrated each day by the suffering victims spur intensified research efforts.

With continuing attention to the many scientific questions yet to be answered and improved public awareness of the benefits of early diagnosis of this disease, there is good cause for optimism that cystic fibrosis can be overcome. The combined efforts of dedicated researchers and volunteers committed to the challenge of cystic fibrosis are a wellspring of hope for patients and their families, and the millions of Americans who may unknowingly carry the genetic trait that produces cystic fibrosis.

Acknowledging the progress of the last twenty-five years, and recognizing the compelling need to expand on past efforts to combat this fatal disorder, the Congress has, by Senate Joint Resolution 186, designated September 19 through 25, 1982, as National Cystic Fibrosis Week, declaring it as a time to consider the profound impact of the disease and the growing sense of hopefulness for the future of cystic fibrosis victims.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning September 19, 1982, as National Cystic Fibrosis Week and call upon the people of the United States to observe that week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 24th day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:49 a.m., September 27, 1982]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on September 25.

Proclamation 4978 -- Lupus Awareness Week, 1982

September 24, 1982

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus) is a serious disorder that can affect many different parts of the body, including the skin, joints, kidneys, heart, central nervous system, and other internal organs. While no one person has all symptoms, and they may occur in varying combinations, there are recognizable patterns of illness that identify patients with lupus.

It is estimated that 500,000 Americans have lupus -- most of them young women. Fortunately, because of the progress that has been made in recent years toward better understanding and increased public awareness of the disease, there is more hope for its victims. Although research has yet to find the cure for lupus, the outlook for patients has improved greatly. Through advances in medical research, including better diagnosis and more effective drug treatment and medical management, many patients with lupus can now look forward to living more productive and happier lives. It is my fervent hope that continuing advances in medical research will improve the quality of life for all lupus patients and eventually lead to the prevention and cure of this serious and distressing disease.

By Senate Joint Resolution 183, the Congress of the United States has requested the President to designate the week beginning October 17, 1982, as Lupus Awareness Week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning October 17, 1982, as Lupus Awareness Week, and I call upon the people of the United States to observe this week by learning more about this disease.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 24th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:50 a.m., September 27, 1982]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on September 25.