Proclamations, January 20, 1983

Proclamation 5014 -- Tricentennial Anniversary Year of German Settlement in America

January 20, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

On October 6, 1683, a group of thirteen Mennonite families, coming from the city of Krefeld, now in the Federal Republic of Germany, founded Germantown, Pennsylvania, today a suburb of Philadelphia. Since then, more than seven million German immigrants have entered the United States and made extraordinary human, economic, political, social, and cultural contributions to the growth and success of our great country.

Today there are more than sixty million Americans of German descent, a number about equal to the total population of the Federal Republic of Germany. More Americans claim German ancestry than any other nationality.

During my address to the Bundestag in Bonn in June of last year, I spoke of the importance which the United States attaches to the Tricentennial year of 1983 commemorating German settlement in America. Despite the legacy of two world wars which found us on opposing sides, West Germany and the United States have forged an exceptionally close relationship during the past three decades. The success of the Marshall Plan, the Berlin Airlift, and the ensuing NATO partnership have led to a recognition of our common democratic ideals and joint interest in Western economic and political strength.

Throughout 1983 there will be numerous activities and observances to celebrate the Tricentennial. President Karl Carstens has accepted my invitation to attend the culminating event in Philadelphia next October.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 260, has designated 1983 as the ``Tricentennial Anniversary Year of German Settlement in America'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a Proclamation in observance of that year. By the same Resolution, the Congress established the Presidential Commission for the German-American Tricentennial to plan, encourage, develop, and coordinate the commemoration of this historic event.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the year commencing on January 1, 1983, as the Tricentennial Anniversary Year of German Settlement in America, and urge all Americans to observe the year with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 20th day of Jan., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:36 a.m., January 21, 1983]

Proclamation 5015 -- Red Cross Month, 1983

January 20, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

American Red Cross volunteers are among the millions of citizens who quietly serve their fellow man. Since the first settlement on our shores, a volunteer spirit has characterized the American way. This spirit has been reflected in the actions of the neighbor who is always ready to lend a hand.

The services performed by the Red Cross provide us with benefits that would otherwise cost billions of dollars. Last year, it was the volunteer who -- giving freely of his or her time, energy, and talent -- made it possible for the Red Cross to collect and provide the ill and injured with nearly six million units of blood. Volunteers established shelters to feed and attend to disaster victims, conducted thousands of courses to improve the quality of life by teaching nutrition, first aid, water safety, home nursing, and preparation for parenthood. The volunteer reached out to our young people, to members of the military, to veterans, and to the elderly and through personal contact eased their loneliness and fears.

For 102 years, the American Red Cross has been an essential ingredient of American life, helping us to learn, to grow, and to prosper. In accordance with this year's theme: ``The Red Cross. We'll Help. Will You?'' I urge all Americans to donate their time and financial resources in support of Red Cross activities. By giving of ourselves, we give the greatest gift one human being can give another -- the gift of love.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America and Honorary Chairman of the American National Red Cross, do hereby designate March 1983 as Red Cross Month.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 20th day of Jan., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:37 a.m., January 21, 1983]

Proclamation 5016 -- National Consumers' Week, 1983

January 20, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

A major function of our competitive free enterprise economy is to satisfy consumer demand. The effective demand of consumers is what keeps producers in the business of supplying goods and services and is vital to keeping the wheels of industry turning. Therefore, it is most important that we fully recognize the crucial role consumers play in our economy.

Everyone is a consumer, but too often this role is the most neglected in terms of preparation and training. In our complex market economy major decisions have to be made about living within our means; protecting our futures through insurance, pension plans, and investments; choosing goods and services from our global marketplace; and voting on issues directly affecting our public and private consumption. Because consumer and economic education can contribute immeasurably to our competence as consumers and citizens, it should be started in the schools at the earliest possible time.

Consumers should have access to a wide assortment of competitively priced goods and services produced here and abroad; accurate information on product content and care, on contractual agreements, on the cost of credit -- essentially whatever facts are needed to make an informed choice. But of greatest importance to consumers and private enterprise is protection against the marketing of goods that are hazardous to health or life, a fair hearing of complaints with appropriate remedies where justified, and dutiful consideration of consumer concerns at all levels of government.

It is clear that the greatest fairness for consumers can be achieved through the active cooperation of business, government, and consumers themselves working to insure equity, increased competition, and safety in our free market economy.

Because an effective and efficient system of commerce depends on an informed and educated public, I urge schools, public and private agencies, and all appropriate public-spirited groups to advance consumer competence by helping provide the necessary consumer and economic information for all our citizens to make well thought-out choices in the marketplace. While the responsibility for consumer education rests primarily with the individual, the communications media and other interested organizations and institutions play an instrumental part in furthering the understanding of American consumers. I urge consumers to avail themselves of this valuable information and to wisely select the goods and services they seek.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week beginning April 24, 1983 as National Consumers' Week.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 20th day of Jan., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:38 a.m., January 21, 1983]