Proclamations, March 7, 1983

Proclamation 5024 -- National Children and Television Week, 1983

March 7, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Television has the power to shape thoughts, stir emotions, and inspire actions. It teaches, it sells, it entertains, it informs, and it has the capacity to influence powerfully the lives and values of our children. They learn much from television about the world, our society, and their place in it.

Television can communicate values that are consistent with our heritage and traditions and can portray those actions and attitudes that make for better citizens. It also can depict themes that are destructive of these values. Recognizing that children are at a formative and vulnerable stage in their lives, many individuals and groups have a great interest in television programming. These concerned citizens are working to improve the quality of television programs viewed by their families.

By Senate Joint Resolution 264 (P.L. 97 - 443), the Congress has designated the week of March 13, 1983, through March 19, 1983, as ``National Children and Television Week'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of that week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of March 13, 1983, through March 19, 1983, as ``National Children and Television Week.'' I commend all those persons concerned about the quality of children's television programming, and I call upon all government agencies and the people of the United States to observe the week with appropriate activities supporting television programs which are attentive to the needs and interests of children.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 7th day of March, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:50 a.m., March 8, 1983]

Proclamation 5025 -- National Poison Prevention Week, 1983

March 7, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The annual observance of National Poison Prevention Week affords communities across America a special opportunity to increase citizen awareness of the dangers of accidental poisoning.

In recent years the number of poisonings among children has fallen dramatically, due in large measure to the introduction of child-protective packaging. At the community level, poison centers are an essential resource in reducing the incidence of serious injury resulting from accidental ingestions. By providing timely diagnostic and treatment information to medical practitioners and first aid instruction to anxious parents, poison centers have successfully worked to save lives.

While poison centers have proved invaluable, they often provide ``after-the-fact'' treatment. This year, National Poison Prevention Week will underscore the equally important role poison centers can play in preventing child poisonings ``before the fact.''

Working together as sponsors of National Poison Prevention Week are national medical, pharmacy, nursing, dental, and hospital associations; health and safety groups; organizations representing manufacturers, packagers, and distributors of consumer products, including medicines; the media; and government agencies. Most of these groups have State and local chapters and affiliates that, along with community organizations, are the backbone of what has become a successful nationwide poison prevention program.

To aid in encouraging the American people to learn of the dangers of accidental poisoning and to take appropriate preventive measures, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved September 26, 1961 (75 Stat. 681), requested the President to issue annually a proclamation designating the third week in March as National Poison Prevention Week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning March 20, 1983, as National Poison Prevention Week.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 7th day of March, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:51 a.m., March 8, 1983]

Proclamation 5026 -- National Agriculture Day, 1983

March 7, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The history of American agriculture is an inspiring story of progress and sacrifice, high technology and individual effort, and frustration and success. It reflects the growth of our country from an untamed wilderness to the highly productive nation and world leader it is today.

Despite flood, frost, heat, hail, drought, and disease, Americans enjoy an abundance of diverse and high quality products. Our 2.4 million farms are the foundation for a trillion-dollar agricultural industry which employs 19 million farm people and which is the primary source of food and fiber for a third of a billion of the world's population. Each American farm worker produces enough food and fiber to support nearly 80 people -- a production achievement unmatched anywhere in the world and unparalleled in history.

The courage, tenacity, and know-how of the American farmer make it possible for our citizens to spend a smaller share of their income on food than do people living in any other country.

To honor those who sustain our agricultural prowess and to achieve a greater understanding of each American's dependence upon a reliable food and fiber supply, the Congress of the United States, by Senate Joint Resolution 235, has authorized and requested the President to proclaim March 21, 1983, as ``National Agriculture Day.''

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim March 21, 1983, as ``National Agriculture Day'' and call upon the people of the United States to observe this day with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 7th day of March, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:52 a.m., March 8, 1983]

Proclamation 5027 -- National Coin Week, 1983

March 7, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Since the beginning of history, coins have played an important role in the story of civilization. They reflect the economic development of their country of origin, as well as the scientific advancement and artistic values of the people who produce and use them. Today, millions of Americans collect coins for both pleasure and profit.

To help foster the public's interest in coin collecting, the United States Mint annually offers proof sets of the current year's coinage. In 1982, the United States Mint struck a commemorative silver half-dollar marking the 250th anniversary of the birth of George Washington. In 1983 - 1984, the first commemorative Olympic coinage ever issued by our country will be introduced in gold and silver.

Recognizing that coin collecting has educational and cultural value, promotes greater understanding of our history and heritage, and is enjoyed by millions of Americans, the Congress, pursuant to House Joint Resolution 516 (Public Law 97 - 239), has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation designating the week beginning April 17, 1983, as ``National Coin Week.''

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning April 17, 1983, as ``National Coin Week'' and call upon the people of the United States to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 7th day of March, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:53 a.m., March 8, 1983]

Proclamation 5028 -- Small Business Week, 1983

March 7, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Our Founding Fathers envisioned a nation whose strength and vitality would emerge from the ingenuity of its people and their commitment to individual liberty. They understood that a nation's prosperity is dependent on the freedom of its citizens to pursue their hopes, dreams, and creative ambitions. American entrepreneurs and small business owners enthusiastically embraced the challenges of freedom and through the miracle of the marketplace set in motion the forces of economic growth that made our Nation uniquely productive. This pattern of economic development has inspired people throughout the world to look to America for a better life.

The Nation grew as our free enterprise system became the mainspring of American progress by encouraging entrepreneurs to compete in meeting the demand for new products and methods of production. Competition enabled us to develop our human resources more effectively and enrich our society. With each new discovery, our perception of what could be achieved expanded.

Today small business plays an even more vital role in our national life and is responsible for the creation of well over half of the new jobs in our economy. Small business is also in the forefront of utilizing technological advances.

America's entrepreneurs and small business owners are among the most dynamic and innovative leaders of the business community. Their willingness to confront uncertainty with creativity and determination to succeed helps our Nation meet the challenges we face today. This spirit of accomplishment inspires Americans to look toward tomorrow with confidence and anticipation to the new opportunities open to future generations. By taking steps to encourage the formation and success of small businesses, America can help ensure its economic standing in the world.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning May 8, 1983, as Small Business Week. I call upon every American to join me in this tribute.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 7th day of March, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:54 a.m., March 8, 1983]