Proclamations, April 4, 1983

Proclamation 5038 -- Swedish-American Friendship Day, 1983

April 4, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

On April 3, 1783, Ambassador Extraordinary Gustav Philip Creutz, representing the King of Sweden, and Benjamin Franklin, Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, signed a Treaty of Amity and Commerce in Paris, France. In the Treaty, they pledged, ``firm, inviolable and universal peace and a true and sincere friendship between the King, his heirs and successors, and the United States of America.''

They could not then know how dramatically that friendship would flourish, and how closely mingled the fates and fortunes of the two lands would become. During the nineteenth century, thousands of Swedes joined the great current of Scandinavian migration to the United States. Once there, they helped push the frontier westward, achieving great successes in agriculture and industry. Their achievements constitute proud monuments to the Swedish-American heritage and to the development of our country.

Democratic ideals, a belief in ingenuity and hard work, concern for the individual, and free trade are among the many values and principles both countries share. Because of the extensive commerce and interchange of persons and ideas between Sweden and the United States, we have long enjoyed a deep understanding of each other.

For these reasons, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 64, has authorized and requested the President to proclaim April 4, 1983, as Swedish-American Friendship Day.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate April 4, 1983, as Swedish-American Friendship Day. I invite the people of the United States to honor the Bicentennial of the Treaty of Amity and Commerce that day by holding appropriate ceremonies and activities in suitable places throughout the land.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:48 a.m., April 5, 1983]

Proclamation 5039 -- National Child Abuse Prevention Month, 1983

April 4, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Child abuse and child neglect continue to threaten the lives and health of over a million of our Nation's children. Their physical suffering and emotional anguish challenge us, as parents, neighbors, and citizens, to increase our attention to their protection and intensify our efforts to prevent their maltreatment.

Children may be endangered by physical battering, denial of the basic necessities for life and health, sexual abuse and exploitation, or emotional cruelty. Public concern can help prevent maltreatment and help protect children. Action taken after cruelty has occurred is often too late. Prevention of abuse requires that neighborhoods and communities be attentive to the problems of families in their midst and be willing to help when help is needed. It requires the active concern of educational, medical, mental health, law enforcement, and social service professionals, and the efforts of volunteers and private citizens.

The health and well-being of our children underlie the future of our Nation. The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 21, has recognized the need for public attention to prevention of child abuse and has requested me to proclaim April 1983 as National Child Abuse Prevention Month.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the month of April 1983 as ``National Child Abuse Prevention Month.'' I urge all citizens to renew our Nation's commitment to meet the serious challenge that child abuse and child neglect pose to the welfare of our children and families.

I invite the Governors of the States; the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the Territories; the Mayor of the District of Columbia; the heads of voluntary and private groups; and the offices of local, State and Federal government to join in this observance. I also urge them to encourage activities whose purpose is to prevent and treat child abuse and child neglect.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 4th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:49 a.m., April 5, 1983]

Proclamation 5040 -- Pan American Day and Pan American Week, 1983

April 4, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

For the last fifty-two years, the proclamation of an annual Pan American Day has brought to the attention of the world the unique harmony of ideals inspiring the nations of the western hemisphere. These common goals of peace, prosperity, and freedom serve as the foundation for the Organization of American States, which is charged with upholding and defending these principles.

The OAS has succeeded admirably in maintaining and strengthening the traditional bonds of friendship among the peoples of the Americas. At the same time, the peacekeeping mechanisms forged by the OAS member nations have proved effective in preventing the level of conflict that has afflicted other areas of the globe.

The commitment of the Pan American nations to work together to solve their problems has prompted the creation of several specialized inter-American agencies. These agencies, along with the major councils of the OAS, have been instrumental in promoting the economic, social, scientific, educational, and cultural development of the Pan American nations. The Inter-American Human Rights Commission also has made a significant contribution to strengthening respect for basic liberties throughout the hemisphere.

Cooperation among Pan American nations is predicated on mutual respect for the individual character and culture of each people. Pan American Day commemorates this high mutual regard and salutes the great progress that has been made within the OAS framework.

On this Pan American Day of 1983, the people of the United States extend warm greetings to their neighbors in the Americas, and reaffirm their commitment to the spirit of solidarity, the ideals and purposes of the inter-American system, and their active support of the Organization of American States.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Thursday, April 14, 1983, as Pan American Day, and the week beginning April 10, 1983, as Pan American Week; and I urge the Governors of the fifty States, and the Governor of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the officials of the other areas under the flag of the United States of America, to honor these observances with appropriate activities and ceremonies.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 4th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:50 a.m., April 5, 1983]

Proclamation 5041 -- Prayer for Peace, Memorial Day, 1983

April 4, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Each year, for more than 100 years, we have gathered on Memorial Day to pay tribute to those men and women who have fallen in battle, sacrificing their lives to preserve our freedom and world peace. In doing this, we are reminded that neither peace nor liberty is guaranteed, and that our national ideals remain threatened by global conflict, economic crises, violence, and aggression.

Throughout our history, America has been a symbol of hope for all people. We must always accept the many responsibilities that this requires. Thus, we are prepared to assist other nations in their struggle for economic progress; to help those in other lands who suffer from political repression and injustice; to deter aggression by strengthening democracy around the globe; and to work tirelessly toward a world without war.

Those who have sacrificed their lives for our country serve as a reminder that our work is unfinished. With vision and purpose and a prayer in our hearts, let us dedicate ourselves to their memory.

In recognition of those Americans to whom we pay tribute today, the Congress, by joint resolution of May 11, 1950 (64 Stat. 158), has requested the President to issue a proclamation calling upon the people of the United States to observe each Memorial Day as a day of prayer for permanent peace and designating a period on that day when the people of the United States might unite in prayer.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Memorial Day, Monday, May 30, 1983, as a day of prayer for permanent peace, and I designate the hour beginning in each locality at 11 o'clock in the morning of that day as a time to unite in prayer. I urge the press, radio, television, and all other information media to cooperate in this observance.

I also request the Governors of the United States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the appropriate officials of all local units of government to direct that the flag be flown at half-staff during this Memorial Day on all buildings, grounds, and naval vessels throughout the United States and in all areas under its jurisdiction and control, and I request the people of the United States to display the flag at half-staff from their homes for the customary forenoon period.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 4th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:51 a.m., April 5, 1983]