Proclamations, April 7, 1983

Proclamation 5043 -- Cancer Control Month, 1983

April 7, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Cancer is a major concern to the American people because statistics demonstrate that at least one out of four Americans now living will become a victim of this disease. However, it is important to recognize that we are making progress against this dread killer -- in basic research, in prevention, and in bringing the fruits of cancer research to the community.

Recent empirical studies and basic research are bringing us close to an understanding of how best to prevent, diagnose, and treat cancer. Such scientific advances as the discovery of the oncogene, or cancer gene, have provided fresh insights into the molecular process of this disease. Also on the horizon are positive developments in several areas that enhance our ability to deal with this disease syndrome: e.g., the utilization of hyperthermia, improved immunotherapeutic techniques that include the use of monoclonal antibodies and new vaccines, and approaches to surgery that, while less severe in nature, remain a major weapon in our arsenal.

We continue to gather information indicating that life-style and environment play a significant part in the incidence of cancer. Today there is a growing awareness of carcinogens and radiation as causative factors in cancer development. We recognize more fully the importance of diet and nutrition as factors in the development and prevention of this disease. As we evaluate the incidence of cancer among various groups of people, we may be able to identify substances that can have a chemopreventive effect on the population as a whole.

Reports issued by the Surgeon General increasingly link cigarette smoking with cancer of the lung and other parts of the body.

A concerted effort has begun to bring the latest advances in cancer care and treatment to the community at large in a more effective way than ever before. We hope that with the good-will, determination, and support of the American people, our continued progress will eventually lead to the control and prevention of this tragic disease.

In 1938, the Congress of the United States passed a joint resolution requesting the President to issue an annual proclamation declaring April to be Cancer Control Month.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the month of April, 1983, as Cancer Control Month. I invite the Governors of the fifty States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the appropriate officials of all other areas under the United States flag, to issue similar proclamations. I also ask the health care professionals, the communications industry, and all other interested persons and groups to unite during this appointed time to reaffirm publicly our Nation's continuing commitment to control cancer.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:59 a.m., April 8, 1983]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on April 8.

Proclamation 5044 -- Crime Victims Week, 1983

April 7, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

For too many years, the scales of justice -- the very hallmark of our free society -- have been out of balance. Too often innocent victims of crime turn to their government for protection and support only to find that the criminal justice system seems unable to achieve two of its fundamental purposes -- protecting those who obey the law and punishing those who break it. Victims and their families must bear the physical, financial, and emotional impact of the crime. It is unjust and inexcusable when they are ignored or mistreated by this system. Victims called for help, and they needed our assistance. Frequently, their pleas have been unheard and their needs have gone unattended.

These were the conclusions of the President's Task Force on Victims of Crime that I established last year. The Task Force conducted hearings around the country, taking testimony from professionals within and outside the system and, most importantly, from victims themselves. The Task Force concluded that the neglect and mistreatment of crime victims are a national disgrace.

I asked the Task Force for recommendations to restore balance to our system. It submitted 68 specific recommendations directed to the Executive Branch and the Congress, State and local legislative bodies, law enforcement officers, the judiciary, prosecutors, defense attorneys, parole boards, bar associations, the religious community, schools, hospitals, the mental health professionals, and the private sector.

No segment of our society should refuse to recognize its responsibility to help. This Administration has already begun implementation of the Task Force's recommendations.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning April 17, 1983, as Crime Victims Week. I urge officials at all levels of government to take immediate and decisive action to meet the needs of crime victims in their jurisdictions. I urge every American to take action to ease the burdens faced by innocent victims. I urge the victims themselves not to despair. You have made us aware of the inequities you have faced, and we are moving forward to correct them. For too long the justice system has failed to address adequately the rights of victims. The time has come to restore the balance. If our system is to survive, it must truly bring justice to all who seek it.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 7th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12 noon, April 8, 1983]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on April 8.

Proclamation 5045 -- National Defense Transportation Day and National Transportation Week, 1983

April 7, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

From Maine to Hawaii, from the Alaskan border to the Gulf of Mexico, America is a land unified, strengthened, and enriched by transportation. We enjoy a mobility unparalleled anywhere in the world. Our transportation systems -- land, water, and air -- enable us to work where we choose, travel where we please, and ship the products of our farms and factories across the country and around the world.

Through the years, transportation developments have paced the growth and progress of our Nation, led to innovations in other industries, contributed significantly to the expansion of our country, and strengthened our defense and the vitality of our economy. Transportation has become one of America's greatest and most valued assets, and the people of the transportation industries are an essential segment of our society.

The Nation has experienced enormous progress in all forms of transportation, from the earliest Erie Canal boats to today's vast inland waterway system; from the clipper ship to the container ship; from yesterday's primitive Lancaster turnpike to our modern 42,000-mile network of interstate highways; from the ribbons of rail that fused a continent to a national rail complex that carries one-and-a-half billion tons of cargo a year; from the first fledgling flight at Kitty Hawk to a national system serving 300 million passengers and hundreds of thousands of general aviation flyers a year; from horse-drawn transit vehicles to today's sleek urban rail cars and buses. America and its transportation industries have grown and prospered, providing employment, security, safe and efficient mobility for all Americans, and opening avenues to the future with such visionary projects as NASA's space shuttle program.

In recognition of the importance of transportation in America and to honor the millions of Americans who serve and supply our transportation needs, the Congress, by joint resolution approved May 16, 1957, has requested that the third Friday in May of each year be designated National Defense Transportation Day; and by a joint resolution approved May 14, 1962, that the week in which that Friday falls be proclaimed National Transportation Week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Friday, May 20, 1983 as National Defense Transportation Day and the week beginning May 15, 1983 as National Transportation Week, and I urge the people of the United States to observe this occasion with appropriate ceremonies which will give full recognition to the importance of our transportation system and the maintenance of its facilities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 7th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:01 p.m., April 8, 1983]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on April 8.

Proclamation 5046 -- World Trade Week, 1983

April 7, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The United States is firmly linked with other nations in the global economy by mutually beneficial international trade. Exports now account for more than 16 percent of the total value of all goods produced in this country. Two of every five acres of farmland produce for export, and one of every eight jobs in manufacturing depends on overseas trade. Indeed, four of every five new manufacturing jobs are export-related.

As the world's largest trading Nation, the United States has much to gain from the continued expansion of world trade and much to lose if it is diminished. As a country that has been built on economic freedom, America must be an unrelenting advocate of free trade.

As an integral part of the marketplace, the free flow of goods and services across international borders serves to raise the living standards and promote the well-being of people throughout the globe. It inspires private initiative and the entrepreneurial spirit which leads to more open markets, greater freedom, and serves as a boon to human progress. In an interdependent world made smaller by modern communications, free trade is even more essential for the continued economic growth and advancement of both industrialized and developing nations. America must not be tempted to turn to protectionism, but lead the way toward freer trade and more open markets where our producers and training partners can compete on a fair and equal basis.

Despite the high volume of our international trade, we still are far from matching the international sales efforts of our leading competitors. Only ten percent of our firms export, and only seven percent of our gross national produce finds its way into foreign markets -- less than half the percentage of our major trading partners.

In this increasingly interdependent world, American business must focus more of its efforts on exporting our goods and services. A promising new tool is now available to increase export participation: the Export Trading Company Act of 1982. This law will help American businesses, particularly small and medium-sized companies, to organize themselves for stronger export efforts with considerably less hindrance by government regulation.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning May 22, 1983, as World Trade Week, and I invite the people of the United States to join in appropriate observances to affirm the enormous potential international trade has for creating jobs and stimulating economic activity in this country, as well as for generating prosperity the world over.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 7th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:02 p.m., April 8, 1983]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on April 8.