Proclamations, April 15, 1983

Proclamation 5050 -- Temporary Duty Increase and Tariff-Rate Quota on the Importation Into the United States of Certain Heavyweight Motorcycles

April 15, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

1. Pursuant to section 201(d)(1) of the Trade Act of 1974 (the Trade Act) (19 U.S.C. 2251(d)(1)), as amended, the United States International Trade Commission (USITC) on February 1, 1983, reported to the President the results of its Investigation No. TA - 201 - 47 under section 201(b) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2251(b)). The USITC determined that motorcycles having engines with total piston displacement over 700 cubic centimeters, provided for in item 692.50 of the Tariff Schedules of the United States (TSUS) (19 U.S.C. 1202), are being imported into the United States in such increased quantities as to be a substantial cause of the threat of serious injury to the domestic industry producing articles like or directly competitive with the imported articles. The USITC recommended the imposition of additional ad valorem duties on imports of such motorcycles of: 45 percent in the first year, 35 percent in the second year, 20 percent in the third year, 15 percent in the fourth year, and 10 percent in the fifth year.

2. On April 1, 1983, pursuant to section 202(b)(1) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2252(b)(1)), and after taking into account the considerations specified in section 202(c) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2252(c)), I determined to impose the additional duties recommended by the USITC, but with tariff-rate quotas to assure small volume producers which have not contributed to the threat of injury continued access to the United States market. In order to treat Japan fairly, I determined to provide a tariff-rate quota also for articles from Japan. On April 1, 1983, in accordance with section 203(b)(1) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2253(b)(1)), I transmitted a report to the Congress setting forth the action I determined to take and the reason it differed from the action recommended by the USITC.

3. Section 503(c)(2) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2463(c)(2)) provides that no article shall be an eligible article for purposes of the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) for any period during which such article is the subject of any action proclaimed pursuant to section 203 of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2253).

4. Section 203(e)(1) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2253(e)(1)) requires that import relief be proclaimed and take effect within 15 days after the import relief determination date.

5. Pursuant to sections 203(a)(1), 203(e)(1), and 503(c)(2) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2253(a)(1), 2253(e)(1), and 2463(c)(2)), I am providing import relief through the temporary increase of import duties imposed in the form of tariff-rate quotas, and the suspension of GSP treatment, on certain motorcycles, as hereinafter proclaimed.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the statutes of the United States, including General Headnote 4 of the TSUS, sections 203, 503, and 604 of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2253, 2463, and 2483), and in accordance with Article XIX of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) (61 Stat. (pt. 5) A58; 8 UST (pt. 2) 1786), do proclaim that --

(1) Part I of Schedule XX to the GATT is modified to conform to the action taken in Annex I to this proclamation.

(2) Subpart B, part 6 of schedule 6 and subpart A, part 2 of the Appendix to the TSUS are modified as set forth in Annex I to this proclamation.

(3)(a) Annex II of Executive Order No. 11888 of November 24, 1975, as amended, listing articles that are eligible for benefits of the GSP when imported from any designated beneficiary developing country, is amended by deleting item 692.50 and substituting item 692.53, as added by Annex I to this proclamation, in lieu thereof.

(b) In order to restore GSP treatment for the motorcycles subject to import relief, Annex II of Executive Order No. 11888 of November 24, 1975, as amended, is further amended by inserting in numerical sequence item 692.52, as added by Annex I of this proclamation, effective upon the termination of the import relief proclaimed herein or of any period of extension of such relief.

(4) In order to provide staged reductions in the rates of duty for those new TSUS items created by Annex I(b) to this proclamation, Annex III to Presidential Proclamation 4707 of December 11, 1979, as amended, is further amended by Annex II to this proclamation, attached hereto and made a part thereof.

(5) Whenever the column 1 rate of duty in the TSUS for any item specified in Annex I(b) to this proclamation is reduced to the same level as, or to a lower level than, the corresponding rate of duty inserted in the column entitled ``LDDC'' by Annex I(b) of this proclamation, the rate of duty in the column entitled ``LDDC'' for such item shall be deleted from the TSUS.

(6) With the exception of paragraph (3)(b), this proclamation shall be effective with respect to articles entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after April 16, 1983, and before the close of April 15, 1988, unless the period of its effectiveness is earlier expressly modified or terminated.

(7) The Commissioner of Customs shall take such action as the United States Trade Representative shall direct in the implementation and administration of the import relief herein proclaimed.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 15th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:31 p.m., April 15, 1983]

Note: The annexes are printed in the Federal Register of April 19, 1983.

Proclamation 5051 -- National Mental Health Week, 1983

April 15, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Mental illness costs this Nation more than $50 billion a year and contributes to declining productivity and rising health costs. Approximately 35 million people a year suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder. In addition, millions more seek professional assistance to alleviate the physical and emotional problems created by excessive stress.

These facts and figures, however, cannot describe the high cost in human suffering from mental illness. Incapacitation -- most often temporary but permanent for some -- may result from severe depression, crippling anxieties, or other manifestations of mental disorders. Yet public fear and misunderstanding of their illnesses place additional burdens on the afflicted and their families.

It is important that the public understand that major advancements brought about by science have made mental illnesses and stress-related disorders greatly amenable to treatment. New technologies have added significantly to the numbers of patients who have improved or recovered following treatment and promise further advances.

In recognition of the importance for our Nation of the treatment, care and support for the mentally ill provided by health professionals, volunteers, and family members, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 52, has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation designating the week of April 10 through April 16, 1983, as National Mental Health Week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week beginning on April 10, 1983, as National Mental Health Week. I call upon health professionals, educators, communications media, the business community, individuals, and public and private organizations concerned with the welfare of their fellow citizens to seek and encourage better understanding of mental disorders and to honor those whose studies, treatment, and support have brought palpable gains and welcome hope to the mentally ill.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:32 p.m., April 15, 1983]

Proclamation 5052 -- Law Day U.S.A., 1983

April 15, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Our Founding Fathers were guided by a belief in the dignity of the individual when they framed our system of government. The Constitution and the Bill of Rights guarantee the blessings of liberty to all, regardless of race, religion, or national origin. These cherished documents bequeath to all Americans the right to equal justice under law and the means to safeguard this right through the legal system.

Today marks our Nation's twenty-sixth annual celebration of Law Day, a day set aside for all Americans to reflect on our legal heritage, the rights we enjoy under our democracy, and the role of law in our society. The theme of this year's Law Day observance is ``Sharing in Justice,'' highlighting both the rights and the responsibilities of each citizen as a participant in shaping and protecting our laws and system of justice.

Each new generation of Americans inherits as a birthright the legal protections secured, protected, and expanded by the vigilance and sacrifice of preceding generations. These rights -- freedom of speech, trial by jury, personal liberty, a representative and limited government, and equal protection of the laws, to name but a few -- give every citizen a vested interest in American justice.

Active participation in our system serves to protect these interests and preserve them for future generations. It is participation that begins in our own neighborhoods, at town meetings, and during open sessions of city government. Meaningful sharing and participation in our system of justice must start where one is affected most: close to home. This is the basis and strength of our Federal system. Sharing in justice also means working for objectives within the legal system, voting thoughtfully and intelligently, expressing views to our elected representatives, serving as jurors, and volunteering to make our neighborhoods, schools, and communities better places for all. The continuous involvement of the people with all levels of government makes our system of justice work.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, in accordance with Public Law 87 - 20 of April 7, 1961, do hereby proclaim Sunday, May 1, 1983, as Law Day U.S.A., and I invite the American people to observe this event with programs emphasizing the need for each citizen to share and participate in our system of justice.

I call upon the legal profession, schools, civic, service, and fraternal organizations, public bodies, libraries, the courts, all media of public information, business, the clergy, and all interested individuals and organizations to focus attention on our Nation's dedication to justice. I also call upon all public officials to display the flag of the United States on all government buildings open on Law Day, May 1, 1983.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 15th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:33 p.m., April 15, 1983]