Proclamations, September 6, 1983

Proclamation 5087 -- Fire Prevention Week, 1983

September 6, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

This great Nation of ours, the richest and most technologically advanced in the world, continues to lead all major industrialized countries in per capita deaths and property loss from fire.

Each year thousands of American lives are lost, billions of dollars in property are needlessly destroyed, and thousands of persons are permanently disfigured or disabled by burn injuries from preventable fires.

Obviously, we must continue to address fire prevention as a national priority, and I strongly urge each citizen to make a personal commitment to aid in the reduction of this senseless and tragic waste of precious lives, property, and natural resources from fire. Through a concentrated effort our Nation can substantially reduce the human suffering and economic losses from fire.

Since most deaths and injuries from fire occur in the home, it is essential that families install and maintain smoke detectors to provide early warning should a fire occur. In addition, each family should establish and practice home fire escape plans. Commercial enterprises and State and local governments should consider installation of fast-response sprinklers to protect lives in residences, hotels, motels, and nursing homes.

An indispensable ingredient of fire prevention is our professional firefighter. Firefighting is one of our most hazardous occupations. We are indebted to the brave men and women who serve communities across the Nation so bravely -- often at the risk of their own safety and sometimes at the cost of their own lives.

We must also applaud the efforts of our fire chiefs, the National Fire Protection Association, the Fire Marshals Association of North America, the International Association of Fire Chiefs, the International Association of Firefighters, the National Volunteer Fire Council, the International Society of Fire Service Instructors, the Joint Council of National Fire Service Organizations, the National Safety Council, and others for their work to reduce fire losses. These dedicated men and women need and merit our assistance and support.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week of October 9 through 15, 1983, as Fire Prevention Week, 1983.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 6th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:08 a.m., September 7, 1983]

Proclamation 5088 -- National School Lunch Week, 1983

September 6, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The National School Lunch Program -- now in its 37th year -- operates to provide nutritious and well-balanced meals to many young people of our country. The school lunch program is an outstanding example of the partnership between the Federal government and State and local governments to make available the food, funds, and technical support that insures continued nutritional assistance for school students.

The youth of America are our greatest resource. The school lunch program demonstrates the awareness, concern, and willingness to work together that we all share in promoting the health and well-being of our students.

Over 23 million lunches are served daily in some 90,000 schools throughout the country. This effort is being conducted by resourceful and creative food service managers and staff in cooperation with government, parents, teachers, and civic groups.

By joint resolution approved October 9, 1962, the Congress designated the week beginning on the second Sunday of October in each year as National School Lunch Week and requested the President to issue annually a proclamation calling for the observance of that week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby urge the people of the United States to observe the week of October 9, 1983, as National School Lunch Week and to give special and deserved recognition to those people at the State and local level who, through their innovative efforts, have made it possible to have a successful school lunch program.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 6th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:09 a.m., September 7, 1983]

Proclamation 5089 -- Columbus Day, 1983

September 6, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

It is fitting that Americans honor those individuals who have altered the course of history in this country by exhibiting great moral character and courage -- men and women who have contributed to the development of personal liberties we enjoy today. Thus, it is especially appropriate that I urge all Americans to honor one of those individuals, Christopher Columbus.

Columbus was a bold and adventurous navigator who left Europe in 1492 in search of new lands and first recorded the sighting of the North American continent. In this sense he personifies the courage and vision so many explorers exhibited during this period. Yet he is more than this. He represents a spirit, the spirit of the Renaissance which contributed to the development of America. Along with Galileo, Copernicus, and others, Columbus symbolizes a quest for knowledge, a willingness and fortitude to go beyond what is accepted as truth in the name of progress. Columbus did not fall off the face of the earth; rather, through daring, risk, and innovation, he discovered new horizons.

Since Columbus discovered America, numerous families have exhibited that same courage and fortitude in setting sail across the seas to become American citizens. By taking that step into the new and unknown, those same families created an opportunity to realize increased prosperity and greater freedom here in these United States. The accomplishments and contributions of Christopher Columbus provide an example of the rewards that can come from taking initiatives. Today Americans have the opportunity and freedom to make accomplishments and contributions of their own and to enjoy the feelings of accomplishment which follow.

Of course Columbus Day is a day of special importance to Americans of Italian heritage. It is a day when all Americans should join in recognizing the great contributions of Italian-Americans to this country's cultural, scientific, athletic and commercial achievements, and religious vitality.

In tribute to the achievement of Columbus, the Congress of the United States, by joint resolution approved April 30, 1934 (48 Stat. 657), as modified by the Act of June 28, 1968 (82 Stat. 250), has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation designating the second Monday in October of each year as Columbus Day.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Monday, October 10, 1983, as Columbus Day. I invite the people of this Nation to observe that day in schools, churches and other suitable places with appropriate ceremonies in honor of this great explorer. I also direct that the flag of the United States be displayed on all public buildings on the appointed day in memory of Christopher Columbus.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 6th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:10 a.m., September 7, 1983]

Proclamation 5090 -- General Pulaski Memorial Day, 1983

September 6, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

On October 11, 1779, the Polish and American patriot Casimir Pulaski was mortally wounded while leading his troops in battle at Savannah, Georgia. Pulaski died fighting in our American Revolution so that we could live as a free and independent Nation.

It is fitting that we should pay tribute to this martyr for freedom and that free men and women everywhere should take this occasion to rededicate themselves to the principles for which Pulaski gave his life. The power of the ideal of freedom remains vital, both in Pulaski's homeland and in his adopted country. In paying tribute to Casimir Pulaski, we pay tribute as well to all those Poles who have sacrificed themselves over the years for their common goal: the freedom of that heroic nation.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, in recognition of the supreme sacrifice General Pulaski made for his adopted country, do hereby designate October 11, 1983, as General Pulaski Memorial Day, and I direct the appropriate Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 6th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:11 a.m., September 7, 1983]

Proclamation 5091 -- White Cane Safety Day, 1983

September 6, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

One of the great blessings of life is to be able to move at will from place to place unhampered by fear for one's personal safety. For those who are blind, the white cane helps to make such freedom of movement possible. It enables the blind to use our streets and public facilities with maximum safety and thereby know the joys of self-reliance and independence and experience a more fulfilling life.

All Americans should be aware of the significance of the white cane and extend every courtesy and consideration to the men and women who carry it. In this way, we respect the privacy of the visually disabled and contribute to enlarging their mobility and independence.

In recognition of the significance of the white cane, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved October 6, 1964 (78 Stat. 1003), has authorized and requested the President to proclaim October 15 of each year as White Cane Safety Day.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim October 15, 1983, as White Cane Safety Day. I urge all Americans to mark this occasion by giving greater consideration to the special needs of the visually disabled, and, particularly, to observe White Cane Safety Day with activities that contribute to maximum independent use of our streets and public facilities by our visually handicapped.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 6th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:12 a.m., September 7, 1983]

Proclamation 5092 -- National Forest Products Week, 1983

September 6, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Throughout our history, our Nation's abundant forests have served us in so many vital respects that we sometimes forget this extraordinary renewable natural resource. The growing and harvesting of trees, and the work force that turns them into useful products, make a valuable contribution to the Nation's economic well-being, and to providing homes for our people.

Familiar and useful items ranging from furniture to grocery bags to turpentine were once parts of trees in the forest. Our forest lands also provide water for homes, agriculture, and industry and pastures for grazing animals. Our forests serve us in many other ways. They provide a home for wildlife and are a source of recreational activities ranging from driving through and enjoying the scenery, to mountain climbing and backpacking in our numerous parks and wilderness areas.

We recognize that maintaining a healthy environment and a healthy economy are essential and complementary goals. We can be proud of our success and commitment to effective forest management, which strikes a vital balance between preservation and development of our forests. Through wise and sensitive management, we will maintain this vitally important part of our Nation's heritage, so those who follow will inherit forests that are even more useful and productive.

To promote greater awareness and appreciation for our forest resources, the Congress, by Public Law 86 - 753, 36 U.S.C. 163, has designated the week beginning on the third Sunday in October as National Forest Products Week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning on October 16, 1983, as National Forest Products Week and request that all Americans express their appreciation for the Nation's forests through suitable activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 6th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:13 a.m., September 7, 1983]