Proclamations, September 15, 1983

Proclamation 5096 -- National Housing Week, 1983

September 15, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The provision of a home and a suitable living environment for every American family continues to be a national housing goal. Homeownership and decent housing instill pride in our citizens and contribute to the vitality of communities throughout America.

The resurgence of America's housing industry is both a contribution to and a result of our Nation's economic recovery. The substantial increase in housing starts in 1983, by restoring and creating thousands of jobs in housing and related industries, has been a major factor in the reduction of unemployment.

In recognition of our Nation's commitment to housing and homeownership and the role that housing plays in economic recovery, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 98, has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation designating the week of October 2 through October 9, 1983, as ``National Housing Week.''

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning October 2, 1983, as National Housing Week, and call upon the people of the United States and interested groups and organizations to observe this week with appropriate activities and events.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:19 a.m., September 16, 1983]

Note: The President signed the proclamation during a meeting with representatives of the National Association of Home Builders in the Oval Office at the White House.

Proclamation 5095 -- National Respiratory Therapy Week, 1983

September 15, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Chronic lung diseases constitute an important health problem in the United States. They afflict nearly 18 million Americans and cause nearly 70,000 deaths each year, many of which are the direct result of cigarette smoking. Thousands of other persons annually suffer some degree of permanent disability as a result of these disorders. The economic cost of these diseases has been estimated to exceed $16 billion annually.

For some of these diseases the cause is unknown, and for many there is no cure. The timely initiation of appropriate therapy, however, can usually slow their progress, relieve their symptoms, reduce the extent of permanent lung damage and respiratory disability, and avert or delay the onset of life-threatening complications. Although the lung damage already caused by these diseases cannot be undone, respiratory therapy may help preserve lung function that might otherwise be irretrievably lost and can also help the patient make the most effective use of that which remains.

Respiratory therapy may take many forms, including drugs to dilate open air passages or protect against respiratory infections; respiratory-assistance techniques to maintain adequate blood oxygen levels; and exercise programs to improve the efficiency of breathing and condition respiratory muscles to bear the increased burden imposed on them. Kicking the smoking habit is also important to all respiratory therapy.

In recognition that chronic lung diseases are an important cause of death, ill health, and disability and that respiratory therapy can do much to lessen their effects, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 67, has authorized and requested the President to proclaim the week of September 25, 1983, through October 1, 1983, as ``National Respiratory Therapy Week.''

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of September 25 through October 1, 1983, as National Respiratory Therapy Week. I call upon all interested organizations and persons to utilize this opportunity to focus public attention on the national health problem posed by chronic lung diseases and to reaffirm our commitment to bring these diseases under effective control.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 15th day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:18 a.m., September 16, 1983]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on September 16.

Proclamation 5097 -- Leif Erikson Day, 1983

September 15, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

In the grand tradition of the Nordic seafarers, Leif Erikson's courageous adventures in the North Atlantic represent an enduring symbol of man's resourceful response to the challenge of exploration and discovery. Medieval sagas describe supplies of timber and wild grapes which he brought back to Greenland from North America. His exploits offer inspiration for our continuing efforts to conquer fear of the unknown and explore new worlds.

Erikson, who was charged by King Olaf I to spread religion among settlers in Greenland, also embodies the tradition of Nordic enrichment of the wider western world. That tradition has been memorably dramatized for Americans during the past year by the Scandinavia Today program across this country. This splendid program has given people in all parts of the United States an admiring new appreciation of the rich cultural and intellectual heritage brought to this country by Nordic immigrants and the vitality of contemporary life in the Nordic countries.

As a mark of respect for the courage of Leif Erikson and the valuable continuing contribution which the Nordic people have made to life in the United States, the Congress of the United States, by joint resolution approved September 2, 1964 (78 Stat. 849, 36 U.S.C. 169c), authorized the President to proclaim October 9 in each year as Leif Erikson Day.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Sunday, October 9, 1983 as Leif Erikson Day. I direct the appropriate Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings that day. I also invite the people of the United States to honor the memory of Leif Erikson on that day by holding appropriate exercises and ceremonies in suitable places throughout the land.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 15th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:32 p.m., September 16, 1983]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on September 16.

Proclamation 5098 -- Thanksgiving Day, 1983

September 15, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Since the Pilgrims observed the initial Thanksgiving holiday in 1621, this occasion has served as a singular expression of the transcending spiritual values that played an instrumental part in the founding of our country.

One hundred and twenty years ago, in the midst of a great and terrible civil conflict, President Lincoln formally proclaimed a national day of Thanksgiving to remind those ``insensible to the ever watchful providence of Almighty God'' of this Nation's bounty and greatness. Several days after the dedication of the Gettysburg battlefield, the United States celebrated its first national Thanksgiving. Every year since then, our Nation has faithfully continued this tradition. The time has come once again to proclaim a day of thanksgiving, an occasion for Americans to express gratitude to their God and their country.

In his remarks at Gettysburg, President Lincoln referred to ours as a Nation ``under God.'' We rejoice in the fact that, while we have maintained separate institutions of church and state over our 200 years of freedom, we have at the same time preserved reverence for spiritual beliefs. Although we are a pluralistic society, the giving of thanks can be a true bond of unity among our people. We can unite in gratitude for our individual freedoms and individual faiths. We can be united in gratitude for our Nation's peace and prosperity when so many in this world have neither.

As was written in the first Thanksgiving Proclamation 120 years ago, ``No human counsel hath devised nor hath any mortal hand worked out these great things. They are the gracious gifts of the Most High God.'' God has blessed America and her people, and it is appropriate we recognize this bounty.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, in the spirit of the Pilgrims, President Lincoln, and all succeeding Presidents, do hereby proclaim Thursday, November 24, 1983, as a National Day of Thanksgiving, and I call upon Americans to affirm this day of thanks by their prayers and their gratitude for the many blessings upon this land and its people.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 15th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:33 p.m., September 16, 1983]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on September 16.

The Office of the Press Secretary stated that the word ``first'' should be deleted from the text where it appears in the second and fourth paragraphs.