Proclamations, September 19, 1983

Proclamation 5099 -- National Historically Black Colleges Day, 1983

September 19, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The one hundred and three historically black colleges and universities in the United States have contributed substantially to the growth and enrichment of the Nation. These institutions have a rich heritage and tradition of providing the challenging higher education so essential to an individual's full participation in our complex technological society.

Historically black colleges and universities bestow forty percent of all degrees earned by black students. They have awarded degrees to eighty-five percent of the country's black lawyers and doctors and fifty percent of its black business executives. Throughout the years, these institutions have helped many underprivileged students to attain their full potential through higher education.

In recognition of the fact that the achievements and goals of these historically black colleges and universities deserve national attention, the Congress of the United States, by Senate Joint Resolution 85, has designated and requested the President to proclaim September 26, 1983, as National Historically Black Colleges Day.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim September 26, 1983, as National Historically Black Colleges Day. I ask all Americans to observe this day with appropriate ceremonies and activities to express our respect and appreciation for the outstanding academic and social accomplishments of the Nation's black institutions of higher learning.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 19th day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:01 a.m., September 20, 1983]

Proclamation 5100 -- Veterans Day, 1983

September 19, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

None among us deserve more respect than the millions of patriotic men and women who have worn our Nation's uniform to preserve America's freedom and world peace.

Our Armed Forces veterans have earned a special day in which you and I may focus on their heroic accomplishments. For their unselfish devotion to duty, Congress established Veterans Day as a national expression of gratitude. On this historic occasion, our hearts and minds should be with our living veterans and their deceased comrades who have contributed so much to the defense of our country's ideals.

From Valley Forge when our Nation was in its infancy, to the Vietnam conflict where our men and women in uniform served and died for the human rights of others, through war and peace, these valiant citizens have answered the call to service with honor and dignity. They are indeed worthy of a formal tribute from a grateful Nation. Special consideration is due to those veterans who are sick and disabled. There is no better tangible expression of our affection than by remembering to visit them at home or in our hospitals.

In order that we pay meaningful tribute to those men and women who proudly served in our Armed Forces, Congress has provided (5 U.S.C. 6103(a)) that November 11 shall be set aside each year as a legal public holiday to honor America's veterans.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Friday, November 11, 1983, as Veterans Day. In recognition of their valor, I urge all Americans to join with me in a fitting salute to our veterans, and I call upon Federal, State, and local government officials as well as private citizens to mark Veterans Day by displaying the flag of the United States, and I ask those Government officials to support fully and personally its observance by appropriate ceremonies throughout the country.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 19th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:21 a.m., September 20, 1983]