Proclamations, September 27, 1983

Proclamation 5105 -- United Nations Day, 1983

September 27, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The United Nations remains today -- 38 years after its creation -- an institution uniquely endowed to promote international political, economic, social, and technical cooperation. Conceived during a brutal war and nurtured in a troubled peace, the United Nations has seen many of its shining promises realized, but many others have been frustrated. More often than the world community can afford, rivalries and divisions among states prompt abuse or misuse of the powers and machinery of the United Nations. Despite these imperfections, the system and its machinery continue to offer opportunities for mediating differences which threaten to erupt in hostilities; for arranging and overseeing agreements to end tensions or conflicts; for promoting the technical and scientific cooperation essential to meet problems of growth and development; and for coping with international emergencies of all kinds.

The people and the Government of the United States of America take pride in the support -- moral, intellectual, political, and financial -- which we have rendered to the United Nations, and in the leadership which we have provided to help bring about its foremost achievements. We also take pride in the knowledge that the principles of the United Nations charter are the same ones which underlie our liberty, our progress, and our development as a democratic society.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Monday, October 24, 1983, as United Nations Day, and urge all Americans to better acquaint themselves with the activities and accomplishments of the United Nations.

I have appointed William M. Ellinghaus to serve as 1983 United States Chairman for United Nations Day, and I welcome the role of the United Nations Association of the United States of America in working with him to celebrate this special day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 27th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 2:59 p.m., September 27, 1983]

Proclamation 5106 -- National Sewing Month, 1983

September 27, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Over fifty million Americans sew at home. Their efforts demonstrate the persistence, skill, and self-reliance which are so characteristic of this Nation. The home sewing industry generates over $3,500,000,000 annually for our economy and serves to introduce many younger Americans to activities which lead to careers in such fields as fashion, textile design, interior design and retail merchandising.

In recognition of the importance of home sewing to our economy, the Congress, by House Joint Resolution 218, has designated September 1983 as ``National Sewing Month.''

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim September 1983 as National Sewing Month. I call upon the people of the United States to observe this month with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-seventh day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:22 a.m., September 28, 1983]

Proclamation 5107 -- National Adult Day Care Center Week, 1983

September 27, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Adult day care centers provide supervised community settings in which partially disabled men and women of all ages can obtain care that may not be available in their own homes. These centers provide opportunities for adults who are socially isolated to find friends and learn skills. Day care centers enable individuals to obtain the care they need without being forced to live in institutions, and they offer needed respite to families whose infirmed relatives live with them.

In recognition that adult day care centers and their dedicated professional staffs serve many health maintenance functions, provide vital medical care, including medication monitoring, therapies, and health education, and provide invaluable opportunities for social interaction to disabled elderly Americans, the Congress of the United States, by House Joint Resolution 132, has designated the week beginning September 25, 1983, as ``National Adult Day Care Center Week'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of that week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning on September 25, 1983, as National Adult Day Care Center Week, and I call upon every American community to consider the value of adult day care centers and to give appropriate recognition to centers offering these important services throughout that week.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 27th day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:23 a.m., September 28, 1983]

Proclamation 5108 -- National Employ the Handicapped Week, 1983

September 27, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Our Nation's history is rooted in the struggle to attain independence: the right of free choice by free citizens in a society that honors the efforts of individuals. The movement of disabled people to full participation in our society, with all its benefits and responsibilities, is an ideal whose time has surely come.

All across this Nation, disabled people are striving to obtain more control over their lives through choices that minimize their reliance and dependence on others. They are taking charge of their own lives and becoming responsible for their own affairs. They are participating in the day-to-day life of the community and fulfilling the whole range of social roles possible in our society.

Since World War II, the United States has set aside one week each year to emphasize ways in which more people with disabilities can be assisted in their efforts to become independent through gainful employment. Despite past and present efforts of employers to hire people with disabilities, the unemployment level of disabled people continues to be unnecessarily high. To solve this problem, we must plan and develop strategies to demonstrate that disabled people are a valuable resource to our economy and our society.

The Congress, by joint resolution of August 11, 1945, as amended (36 U.S.C. 155), has called for the designation of the first full week in October of each year as National Employ the Handicapped Week. During this week, let us renew our commitments to expand the opportunities for disabled citizens and help them to attain their personal goals.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning October 2, 1983, as National Employ the Handicapped Week.

I urge all governors, mayors, other public officials, leaders in business and labor, private citizens, and especially the disabled citizens of this great Nation to help meet the challenge of the day. Let us all work together to fulfill the dreams of our disabled citizens: full participation in our expanding economy.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 27th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 2:39 p.m., September 28, 1983]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on September 28.

Proclamation 5109 -- National High School Activities Week, 1983

September 27, 1983

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Extracurricular activities in the high schools of this country provide our students with valuable opportunities to discover and develop talents in areas other than those covered within the classroom. Extracurricular activities also build school spirit and demonstrate the importance of promoting common goals.

Through such programs as student government, athletics, music, drama, debate, journalism, community service, and many others, students gain key insights into the roles which competition and cooperation play in our society. Moreover, these experiences help students to learn to set and achieve goals, to organize their time effectively, and to enhance the social skills that are needed to enjoy and succeed in life.

In recognition of the significant place extracurricular opportunities have in the growth of our high school students, the Congress of the United States, by Senate Joint Resolution 101, has authorized and requested the President to proclaim the week of October 17 through October 23, 1983 as National High School Activities Week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning October 17, 1983 as National High School Activities Week, and I call upon the people of the United States to observe this period with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 27th day of Sept., in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 2:40 p.m., September 28, 1983]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on September 28.