Proclamations, October 3, 1984

Proclamation 5240 -- National Community Leadership Week, 1984

October 3, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Local communities form the foundation of our Nation. Our Federal system of government is based on the determination of the people of the United States to govern themselves, to the extent possible, in small entities capable of responding quickly and effectively to particular community values and needs.

Qualified and well-trained leadership at all levels of government, but particularly in our local communities, is essential to the maintenance and strengthening of our democratic institutions. Throughout the United States, many communities have established programs to help citizens identify and discharge the responsibilities involved in leadership positions assumed in their own communities. These programs have produced thousands of talented and well-trained local leaders who are aware of the unique problems confronting their communities and are well-prepared to devise innovative solutions for those problems.

The Congress of the United States, by House Joint Resolution 574, has designated the week beginning September 9, 1984, as ``National Community Leadership Week'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning September 9, 1984, as National Community Leadership Week.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this third day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:12 p.m., October 3, 1984]

Proclamation 5241 -- Emergency Medicine Week, 1984

October 3, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Each year an estimated nine million people in this country sustain injuries which require immediate medical attention. Two groups of dedicated Americans provide this kind of medical care: emergency department personnel, who provide care in trauma centers, and emergency medical technicians and paramedics, most of them volunteers, who provide prehospital emergency care.

These emergency medical personnel throughout our Nation are specialists trained to handle illnesses and injuries which threaten life or limb. They must be available daily on a 24-hour basis to all patients who need medical aid. The efforts of these trained men and women have saved thousands of lives.

Vast improvements in emergency medicine have been made in the past fifteen years, and emergency department personnel have completed extensive training and continuing education to keep up with these improvements. The Departments of Transportation and Health and Human Services, together with State and local governments, have provided radio communications systems, equipment, and training courses for emergency medical personnel. These advances make it possible to respond quickly to the needs of the injured and to transport them to appropriate hospital emergency medical facilities within the ``Gold Hour'' after the injury. This is the time when emergency medical care is most effective in saving lives.

We salute the Nation's emergency medical services personnel: those who staff the ambulances, those who provide medical control, and those physicians and nurses in the trauma centers whose daily efforts are devoted to emergency medicine. We all depend upon their skills and dedication.

The Congress, by House Joint Resolution 545, has designated the week of September 16 through 22, 1984 as ``Emergency Medicine Week'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in honor of this observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of September 16 through September 22, 1984 as Emergency Medicine Week.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this third day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:13 p.m., October 3, 1984]

Proclamation 5242 -- World War I Aces and Aviators Day, 1984

October 3, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Ever since the Revolutionary War, Americans have heroically served their country in times of conflict. World War I, ``the war to end all wars,'' began over seventy years ago in August 1914. The war spawned a new breed of warrior, the aviator, who engaged in single combat high above the conflict on the ground. The truly remarkable Americans who pioneered in this new form of military combat defended the skies of Europe with valor and distinction until the end of the war in 1918.

Some of these aviators achieved the title ``Ace'' by gaining at least five confirmed victories over opponents in the air. As aviators capable of great concentration and decisive action, they possessed what today we would call ``the right stuff.'' Among America's greatest World War I Aces, Eddie Rickenbacker, Frank Luke, Raoul Lufbery and George Vaughn shot down a total of 78 enemy aircraft.

There are about sixty known surviving Aces of World War I. They meet periodically to share memories of a conflict familiar to many Americans only through history books. All Americans should express their gratitude and respect for these gallant air warriors for their extraordinary feats in defense of liberty.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 333, has designated September 21, 1984, as ``World War I Aces and Aviators Day'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this event.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim September 21, 1984 as World War I Aces and Aviators Day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this third day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:14 p.m., October 3, 1984]

Proclamation 5243 -- National Adult Day Care Center Week, 1984

October 3, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Progress in medical science and the generally rising level of health care available from birth onwards have been among our Nation's greatest achievements in this century. As a result, more people are living to an old age than ever before.

The corollary to this achievement is an increase in the incidence of chronic illnesses affecting people as they age. Those who suffer these illnesses may require care over a long period of time, a fact which tests our Nation's ability to provide older Americans the kind of care that will allow them to continue to live independently in their communities.

The rapid growth of adult day care centers is a reflection of increasing community interest in developing long-term alternatives in community settings. Adult day care centers provide comprehensive personal, medical, and therapeutic help and also assist older people and the handicapped in achieving maximum levels of independence and social interaction. They provide much needed support for families as they care for their loved ones. Many adult day care centers throughout the country have recognized the vital needs of older people and the desire that many of them have to remain in their own homes as long as possible.

To increase public awareness of the importance of these centers, the Congress, by House Joint Resolution 505, has designated the week beginning September 23, 1984, as ``National Adult Day Care Center Week'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this event.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning September 23, 1984, as National Adult Day Care Center Week.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this third day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:16 p.m., October 3, 1984]

Proclamation 5244 -- Child Health Day, 1984

October 3, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

America as never before is the land of opportunity for all our children. But for some, that opportunity is denied by illness or disability. Although our health care system is the envy of the world, disease or accident can still deprive many of our children of this birthright of opportunity.

Today, we celebrate tremendous accomplishments in child health. The significant and steady decline in infant mortality, and the great strides in preventing such diseases as polio or measles, are proud examples of what can be accomplished by a free and vibrant medical care system.

On this Child Health Day, 1984, however, we must dedicate ourselves to increasing our efforts. Past achievements only suggest that greater things can be accomplished in the future. We must dedicate ourselves to making further progress in reducing infant mortality for our whole society, and we must also seek to reduce infant mortality in those areas where the level is higher than the national average.

There also are severely handicapped infants who require not only the love and support of their families but who also must have the help of many groups in their communities -- doctors, hospitals, health departments, providers of health care, and others -- if they are to thrive.

There are teenage mothers and teenagers who become involved with abuse of alcohol and other substances -- all these young people need our help and attention. During the coming year, it is my hope that we can continue to demonstrate what a free, energetic, and enlightened society can do cooperatively to protect and improve the health status of our Nation's most vital asset, our children.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, pursuant to a joint resolution approved May 18, 1928, as amended (36 U.S.C. 143), do hereby proclaim Monday, October 1, 1984, as Child Health Day, 1984.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this third day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:17 p.m., October 3, 1984]

Proclamation 5245 -- National Birds of Prey Conservation Week, 1984

October 3, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

This Nation has been blessed with a rich variety of wildlife, including more than fifty kinds of hawks, falcons, eagles, vultures, and owls. Known as birds of prey, these species possess extraordinary beauty, strength, and power of flight. Inhabiting virtually every territory, often coexisting with man, they are a vital part of many natural systems and contribute significantly to the quality of the human environment.

From time immemorial, the history of mankind has been intertwined with birds of prey. The silent flight of the owl, the breathtaking swoop of the falcon across a mountain cliff, the effortless soaring of vultures over the plains, and the often spectacular passage of hawks on migration have captured the imagination of Americans. Since 1782, the Bald Eagle has served as the National Emblem of the United States.

As our country continues to grow and develop, we must remember our natural heritage and the need to provide future generations with opportunities to experience the excitement of a majestic eagle, a plummeting falcon, or the haunting call of an owl at night. The prosperity of this Nation rests upon both our material wealth and those values that enrich the quality of life. The preservation and propagation of our magnificent birds of prey will mean that these noble creatures will continue to awe and inspire generations of Americans yet unborn.

To emphasize the efforts of the many Americans who share appreciation for birds of prey and the need for their continued welfare, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 230 approved July 3, 1984, has designated the week of October 7 through October 13, 1984, as ``National Birds of Prey Conservation Week'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation for this observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of October 7 through October 13, 1984, as National Birds of Prey Conservation Week. I encourage all Americans to observe this week by participating in appropriate ceremonies and activities planned by government agencies, individuals, and private associations and institutions throughout the country to promote the appreciation and conservation of birds of prey.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this third day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:18 p.m., October 3, 1984]

Proclamation 5246 -- National Neighborhood Housing Services Week, 1984

October 3, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

America's neighborhoods, composed of individuals of diverse racial, ethnic, social, religious, and economic backgrounds, stand as a tribute to our Nation's democratic traditions and beliefs.

The preservation and improvement of the residential, commercial, and other facilities in neighborhoods throughout our country are essential to the strength of America's families and businesses. These have been and will continue to be the goals of the Neighborhood Housing Services programs.

Neighborhood Housing Services programs are partnerships of local residents, business leaders, and government officials. They have generated over two billion dollars in reinvestment funds to revitalize and preserve our country's neighborhoods. The success of these programs depends largely on the spirit of cooperation and voluntarism that is a hallmark of American life.

In recognition of those who have contributed their time, money, and energy to the preservation of our neighborhoods, the Congress, by House Joint Resolution 566, has designated the week beginning October 7, 1984, as ``National Neighborhood Housing Services Week'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning October 7, 1984, as National Neighborhood Housing Services Week, and I call upon the people of the United States and interested groups and organizations to observe this week with appropriate activities and events.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this third day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:18 a.m., October 4, 1984]