Proclamations, October 11, 1984

Proclamation 5255 -- Smokey Bear Week, 1984

October 11, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Our forests and grasslands constitute a major renewable natural resource of the Nation. As such, they must be carefully nurtured and protected if we are to pass on their precious legacy of use and enjoyment to future generations of Americans.

The importance of forests and grasslands to the stability of our environment in terms of air quality, water, wildlife, range, timber, and recreation is beyond calculation. Furthermore, the list of products from these lands that enhance our lives is extensive.

We are especially fortunate that as usage of our forests and rangelands has doubled over the past four decades, the number of acres damaged by wildfires has been reduced by half. This important development is due to increased public awareness of the dangers of fire, prompted in great measure by the untiring fire prevention efforts of Smokey Bear and his everpresent reminder, ``Only you can prevent forest fires.''

This year marks the fortieth anniversay of the introduction of Smokey Bear into the Cooperative Fire Protection Campaign conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service, the Advertising Council, and the National Association of State Foresters. On this occasion, it is appropriate to acknowledge the success of this unique public service campaign to promote public concern for prevention of forest fires and wise stewardship of our forests.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 273, has designated the week of October 7, 1984, through October 13, 1984, as ``Smokey Bear Week'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue an appropriate proclamation.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim October 7, 1984, through October 13, 1984, as Smokey Bear Week, and I call upon all Americans to celebrate this week with appropriate ceremonies.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 11th day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:21 p.m., October 12, 1984]

Proclamation 5256 -- General Pulaski Memorial Day, 1984

October 11, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

General Casimir Pulaski fell at the Battle of Savannah 205 years ago, but his memory is still fresh among all those who prize freedom and value independence. General Pulaski was a patriot for two countries. The United States and Poland share the noble legacy of a hero who gave his life so that the torch of freedom would never be extinguished. In his native Poland, he struggled to oppose foreign occupation; in his adopted land, America, he fought to the death for the independence of the thirteen colonies.

In honoring General Pulaski, we also honor the generations of Polish Americans who, inspired by Pulaski's shining example and his spirit of self-sacrifice, have made great cultural, economic, and political contributions to American life. Without their achievements, the United States would be a very different and a far poorer country.

Polish Americans join with all of their fellow citizens in noting that the struggle for freedom and human rights continues. It is important to take this occasion to recommit ourselves to the support of the cause of genuine national reconciliation for Poland.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Thursday, October 11, 1984, as General Pulaski Memorial Day, and I direct the appropriate Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on that day. In addition, I encourage the people of the United States to commemorate this occasion as appropriate throughout the land.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:22 p.m., October 12, 1984]