Proclamations, October 18, 1984

Proclamation 5262 -- National Head Injury Awareness Month, 1984

October 18, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Head injury is a very serious national health problem. As many as 700,000 Americans are hospitalized every year for head injuries caused by motor vehicle accidents, sporting mishaps, and falls. Of these patients, roughly 100,000 die. Another 50,000 -- mostly under the age of 30 -- suffer permanent brain damage that prevents them from returning to schools, jobs, or normal lives.

Each of these grim statistics represents a person whose bright future was suddenly and tragically altered. Added to each victim's suffering is the emotional and financial burden the family must bear. The total cost to the Nation for special care and lost productivity is enormous.

Health care professionals and educators throughout our Nation are helping those with head injuries to live as normally as possible. Through rehabilitation therapy and vocational counseling, many head injury patients are learning to lead productive lives in our society. Such efforts have been promoted by two voluntary health agencies: the National Head Injury Foundation and the Family Survivial Project for Brain-Damaged Adults.

Biomedical research is also the source of increased hope. Investigators supported by the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke are acquiring new information about what happens to the brain as a result of head injury. Leads from these studies will help scientists develop effective treatments to limit or prevent brain damage. With the combined support of voluntary health agencies and the Federal Government, the tragedy of head injury can be substantially reduced.

To encourage public recognition of and compassion for the complex problems caused by head injury, the Congress, by House Joint Resolution 638, has designated the month of October 1984 as ``National Head Injury Awareness Month'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this month.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the month of October 1984 as National Head Injury Awareness Month. I call upon all government agencies, health organizations, communications media, and people of the United States to observe this month with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eighteenth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:09 a.m., October 19, 1984]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on October 19.

Proclamation 5263 -- National Forest Products Week, 1984

October 18, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Aside from an industrious and imaginative people, no single natural resource has contributed more to the economic and social growth of this mighty Nation than its forests. Without forests to provide the renewable raw materials for our Nation, American history would have been written quite differently. Without the amazing power of forests to give birth to our great rivers and hold our soil in place, the United States would be much less productive. Without their great diversity as habitat and food source for wildlife, our rich array of fish, birds, and wildlife could not exist. These benefits from our vast forests have made this an abundant land.

The foresight we have shown in wise protection and use of forests ensures that they will continue to contribute to a bright future. Although a third of the United States -- some 737 million acres -- is forested, such continued abundance was in doubt at the beginning of this century. Forests were disappearing at an alarming rate, and timber famine was predicted. The forest conservation leadership of such people as President Theodore Roosevelt and the Nation's first trained forester, Gifford Pinchot, reversed that trend, leaving a legacy for which present and future generations can be deeply thankful.

The conservation legacy demonstrates that forests can be protected, while also being used for the economic and social benefit of mankind. Wood for our Nation's products is harvested from the vast forests but, like our food crops, new trees must be planted for the next generation. This simple, but critical, principle has proved its enduring worth beyond the dreams of the conservation pioneers. Each year we enjoy an abundance of harvest timber and, as a result, jobs for millions of workers in related industries.

To promote greater awareness and appreciation for the multiple benefits of our forest resources to the United States and world economy, the Congress, by Public Law 86 - 753 (36 U.S.C. 163), has designated the week beginning on the third Sunday in October as National Forest Products Week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning October 21, 1984, as National Forest Products Week and request that all Americans express their appreciation for the Nation's forests through suitable activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eighteenth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:10 a.m., October 19, 1984]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on October 19.

Proclamation 5264 -- Lupus Awareness Week, 1984

October 18, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Systemic lupus erythematosus (also known as lupus or SLE) is an inflammatory disease of connective tissue, which can produce changes in the structure and function of the skin, joints, and internal organs. Most often found in young women, lupus affects more than 500,000 victims. Ninety percent of these victims are women in the prime of life.

In recent years, the outlook for lupus patients has improved due to extensive and vigorous research. Positive results have emerged from studies uncovering several diverse defects of the immune system and from research on genetic and environmental factors influencing the disease. Studies on estrogen metabolism, data systems development and epidemiology have been fruitful. Evaluations of the course and treatment of the disease and its complications, and studies aimed at developing improved treatment, including new drugs and techniques, are all proving useful.

In order for us to take advantage of the knowledge already gained, public awareness of the characteristics and treatment of lupus -- and of the need for continuing scientific research -- remains essential. The Federal government and private voluntary organizations have developed a strong and enduring partnership committed to lupus research. I am confident that this concerted effort will ultimately uncover the cause and cure for this devastating disease.

In recognition of the need for greater public awareness of lupus, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 239, has designated the week of October 21 through October 27, 1984, as ``Lupus Awareness Week'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of October 21 through October 27, 1984, as Lupus Awareness Week, and I call upon the people of the United States to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eighteenth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:11 a.m., October 19, 1984]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on October 19.

Proclamation 5265 -- National Women Veterans Recognition Week, 1984

October 18, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

I am honored indeed to bring to the Nation's attention the remarkable contributions of women veterans. During World War I, the service of women on active duty as nurses, shipyard personnel, and battlefield telephone operators was indispensable. In World War II, women served in support and operational capacities around the world. Since World War II, women have been fully integrated into the military services. Today there are more than 1.2 million women veterans.

As active participants in America's defense, women serving in the Armed Forces have safeguarded our heritage. Their courage, selflessness, and dedication to duty deserve our deepest gratitude. Let us revere always the memory of those who gave their lives in military service; let us honor anew those who served valiantly on landing beaches, in field hospitals, and in prisoner-of-war camps.

Our laws grant equal rights, privileges, and benefits to women veterans; and my Administration will continue to ensure that women veterans are afforded the benefits and services to which they are entitled. I know that all Americans join me in saluting these patriotic and dedicated women and in expressing the Nation's appreciation for their service.

In order to show our appreciation for the contributions of women veterans, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 227, has designated the week beginning November 11, 1984, as ``National Women Veterans Recognition Week'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning November 11, 1984, as National Women Veterans Recognition Week.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eighteenth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:05 p.m., October 19, 1984]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on October 19.