Proclamations, October 19, 1984

Proclamation 5266 -- A Time of Remembrance for All Victims of Terrorism Throughout the World

October 19, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Terrorism poses an insidious challenge to the principles of freedom cherished by peace-loving peoples everywhere. Despicable acts such as the recent attack on Prime Minister Thatcher in England, the bombings of our Marine Amphibious Unit Headquarters, and of our Embassy facilities in Beirut, Lebanon, represent an attempt to strike at the very heart of Western democratic values. In the month of September, 37 attacks were carried out by 13 different terrorist groups affecting the people of 20 nations.

As a world power, the United States bears global responsibilities from which we must not shrink in the face of cowardly attempts at intimidation. Instead, we must strive to carry forward the heroic legacy of those brave people who, in the search for peace and justice, have lost their lives to international terrorism. Because terrorism poses such a pervasive and insidious threat to all free peoples and claims so many innocent victims in its indiscriminate brutality, we of the Western democracies have embarked on a course of improved cooperation to counter this scourge against humanity. To this end, it is appropriate that we reflect on the tragic loss of life that senseless terror leaves in its wake throughout the world. We do this not out of fear or trepidation, but to show our resolve that the free people of this world will not be deterred from our purpose by threats of terrorism.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 336, has designated October 23, 1984, as ``A Time of Remembrance'' for all victims of terrorism throughout the world and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this event.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim October 23, 1984, as a Time of Remembrance for all victims of terrorism throughout the world, and I urge all Americans to take time to reflect on the sacrifices that have been made in the pursuit of peace and freedom.

I further call upon and authorize all departments and agencies of the United States and interested organizations, groups, and individuals to fly United States flags at half-staff on October 23 in the hope that the desire for peace and freedom will take firm root in every person and every nation.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this nineteenth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 2:32 p.m., October 19, 1984]

Proclamation 5267 -- United Nations Day, 1984

October 19, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The founding of the United Nations 39 years ago offered new hope that international political, economic, social and technical cooperation could be achieved in a more peaceful world. That hope remains, though we are aware of the difficulties in turning it into reality. The deeply rooted political conflicts that divide nations have at times prevented the proper use of the United Nations for the practical expression of the principles embodied in its Charter. We have been particularly disappointed with some of the actions taken at the United Nations in recent years, actions which fall far short of the high ideals on which that organization was founded.

The United States nonetheless continues to place considerable importance on the United Nations as the body designed to afford all nations opportunities for the peaceful settlement of disputes and for the promotion of technical cooperation in such areas as aviation, shipping, telecommunications, postal services and agriculture. It is the hope of the United States that the UN will live up to its founding principles and create the conditions which will encourage nations to cooperate for the furtherance of their common interests. It is vital that all member nations do their part in pursuit of this goal, that the principle of universality be upheld in UN actions, and that with respect to human rights all states be held to a single standard of justice.

The people and government of the United States feel a close identification with the mission of the United Nations and watch closely what happens there. We take seriously the content of the speeches made in the United Nations, and we take careful note of the votes cast by member countries. We are keenly conscious of the importance of the United Nations to the world community. With the experience gained from the past 39 years, we will work with other member nations to maintain international peace and security, to develop friendly relations among nations based on mutual respect, to find solutions to the problems that divide us, and to promote respect for the human rights of every individual.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Wednesday, October 24, 1984, as United Nations Day and urge all Americans to acquaint themselves better with the activities and accomplishments of the United Nations. I have appointed Theodore A. Burtis to serve as 1984 United States Chairman for United Nations Day, and I welcome the role of the United Nations Association of the United States of America in working with him to celebrate this special day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this nineteenth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 2:33 p.m., October 19, 1984]

Proclamation 5268 -- Veterans Day, 1984

October 19, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The eleventh hour is often used to mean ``the last possible time.'' The First World War was ended on the eleventh hour -- as well as the eleventh day in the eleventh month.

If the idealistic hope that World War I was ``the war to end all wars'' had been realized, November 11 might still be called Armistice Day. But World War II shattered that dream. And after the Korean War, Armistice Day became Veterans Day. Under that name, each November 11, our Nation shows its respect for those who have worn its uniform in defense of freedom.

Veterans Day has become a significant part of our national heritage as we recognize the important contributions of millions of our citizens whose military service has had a profound effect on history. More than 39 million in number, they fought and died from Bunker Hill to Bastogne, from the Marianas to the Mekong Valley in Vietnam. By preserving our freedom, they also made it possible for us to continue our search for a world at peace. That search remains the highest priority of my Administration. It is a debt we owe to the soldiers, sailors, and airmen who put their lives at risk so that their children and grandchildren would never need to know the horrors of war.

Veterans Day offers the Nation an opportunity to show our pride and say ``thank you.'' Furthermore, it provides an important opportunity to rededicate ourselves to Lincoln's call to Congress and the American people ``to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow and his orphan.''

Eighty-five percent of the 28 million veterans alive today served during our country's wars. Just as they did not disappoint us in battle, they have not disappointed us in our present search for peace. Their service significantly influences America's role in world affairs, and they all deserve our gratitude.

I believe we should all seek ways to express our collective appreciation for their service and sacrifice. I invite all Americans to join me in observing Veterans Day -- through appropriate ceremonies, activities and private thoughts on November 11.

In order that we may pay meaningful tribute to those men and women who proudly served in our Armed Forces, Congress has provided (5 U.S.C. 6103(a)) that November 11 shall be set aside each year as a legal public holiday to honor America's veterans.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Sunday, November 11, 1984, as Veterans Day, and I invite all Americans to join with me in paying tribute to those patriots of all generations who have drawn upon their freedom for the will and the courage to fight for their country and the ideals for which it stands.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this nineteenth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 2:34 p.m., October 19, 1984]

Proclamation 5269 -- Thanksgiving Day, 1984

October 19, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

As we remember the faith and values that made America great, we should recall that our tradition of Thanksgiving is older than our Nation itself. Indeed, the native American Thanksgivings antedated those of the new Americans. In the words of the eloquent Seneca tradition of the Iroquois, ``. . . give it your thought, that with one mind we may now give thanks to Him our Creator.''

From the first Pilgrim observance in 1621, to the nine years before and during the American Revolution when the Continental Congress declared days of Fast and Prayer and days of Thanksgiving, we have turned to Almighty God to express our gratitude for the bounty and good fortune we enjoy as individuals and as a nation. America truly has been blessed.

This year we can be especially thankful that real gratitude to God is inscribed, not in proclamations of government, but in the hearts of all our people who come from every race, culture, and creed on the face of the Earth. And as we pause to give thanks for our many gifts, let us be tempered by humility and by compassion for those in need, and let us reaffirm through prayer and action our determination to share our bounty with those less fortunate.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, in the spirit and tradition of the Iroquois, the Pilgrims, the Continental Congress, and past Presidents, do hereby proclaim Thursday, November 22, 1984, as a day of National Thanksgiving. I call upon every citizen of this great Nation to gather together in homes and places of worship to celebrate, in the words of 1784, ``with grateful hearts . . . the mercies and praises of their all Bountiful Creator. . . .''

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this nineteenth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 2:35 p.m., October 19, 1984]