Proclamations, October 30, 1984

Proclamation 5270 -- National Christmas Seal Month, 1984

October 30, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Chronic diseases of the lungs are responsible for large numbers of deaths and disabilities among Americans. More than 17 million people have chronic lung diseases, and an estimated 225,000 Americans will die this year from them. The cost to this Nation is nearly $30 billion in medical expenses and lost wages, and untold millions more in lost productivity.

Emphysema and chronic bronchitis afflict ten million Americans. Asthma affects another seven million people, two million of whom are children. Before the end of this decade, lung cancer will have surpassed breast cancer as the leading cause of cancer deaths among American women.

The American Lung Association (ALA), through its community lung associations, continues the tradition started in 1904 of leading the effort to control and prevent pulmonary diseases. The ALA is this Nation's first voluntary, nonprofit public health organization. Formed originally to combat tuberculosis, the ALA, together with its medical/scientific arm -- the American Thoracic Society -- now has widened its scope to include all forms of lung diseases and its causes, including smoking, air pollution, and occupational hazards.

To help pioneer and develop health education and research programs aimed at better treatment and prevention of lung diseases, the ALA relies on the sale of Christmas Seals. The Association has used Christmas Seals since 1907 to raise funds through private contributions to continue its research programs.

This year, 60 million homes will receive Christmas Seals. The funds raised through the sale of Christmas Seals have enabled the ALA to provide many millions of dollars for research programs on the prevention and control of lung diseases. Christmas Seals also have allowed the ALA to conduct vigorous public campaigns against air pollution and cigarette smoking. The use of Christmas Seals on holiday mail is a visible reminder that chronic lung diseases remain a serious public health problem, but one that can be in large part prevented through research and public education.

To increase public awareness of chronic lung diseases and the benefits realized by the sales of Christmas Seals, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 324, has designated the month of November as ``National Christmas Seal Month'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this month.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the month of November 1984 as National Christmas Seal Month, and I call upon all government agencies and the people of the United States to observe this month with appropriate activities and by supporting the Christmas Seal program.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:01 p.m., October 31, 1984]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on October 31.

Proclamation 5271 -- National Diabetes Month, 1984

October 30, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Diabetes mellitus is one of the most serious medical and public health problems challenging this Nation today. Approximately 11 million Americans suffer from this disease. Although careful treatment can control many of the short-term metabolic effects of diabetes, the disease is also associated with serious long-term complications that affect the eyes, kidneys, nervous system, and blood vessels. Physical, emotional, and financial consequences of this disease impose an enormous burden on its sufferers, their families, and the Nation in general. Diabetes-related health care, disability, and premature mortality alone cost more than $14 billion annually. The non-monetary costs are also staggering. Moreover, the prevalence of diabetes is increasing in the United States.

In recent years, there has been an enormous amount of progress in understanding, diagnosing, and treating diabetes. The National Diabetes Advisory Board, established by the Congress, has recently reported that ``Not since the discovery of insulin over half a century ago has the outlook for clinical advances in the treatment and ultimate prevention and cure of diabetes been as promising as today.'' Researchers continue to discover clues to the causes of this disease and its complications. New and better forms of treatment are being developed and tested.

However, basic biomedical research and its translation into clinical practice still remain the bedrock of hope for discovering the ultimate answers to this complex disease and its myriad complications. The Federal government, in cooperation with the private sector, is deeply committed to supporting basic research on diabetes so that we can conquer this major public health problem for all present and future Americans.

To increase public awareness of diabetes and emphasize the need for continued research efforts, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 299, has designated the month of November 1984 as ``National Diabetes Month'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of that month.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the month of November 1984 as National Diabetes Month, and I call upon all government agencies and the people of the United States to observe this month with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:02 p.m., October 31, 1984]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on October 31.

Proclamation 5272 -- National Hospice Month, 1984

October 30, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Hospice care is a humanitarian way for terminally ill patients to approach the end of their lives in relative comfort and dignity. Increasing numbers of patients have chosen to enter hospice programs in recent years because of the competent and compassionate care they provide outside of the hospital environment.

Hospices care for both patients and their families by attending to their physical, emotional, and spiritual needs. A team of physicians, nurses, social workers, pharmacists, counselors, and community volunteers work together to meet the needs of the terminally ill.

The importance of hospices as an integral part of our Nation's health care system is increasingly recognized. The growth of hospices was encouraged in November 1983 when the Federal government added hospice care to the benefits available to people under Medicare.

In order to encourage greater public recognition of hospice care, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 334, has designated November 1984 as ``National Hospice Month'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this month.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim November 1984 as National Hospice Month, and I call upon appropriate government officials, all citizens, and interested organizations and associations to observe this month with activities that recognize this important event.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:03 p.m., October 31, 1984]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on October 31.

Proclamation 5273 -- Commemoration of the Great Famine in the Ukraine

October 30, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The Ukrainian famine of 1932 - 1933 was a tragic chapter in the history of the Ukraine, all the more so because it was not the result of disasters of nature, but was artificially induced as a deliberate policy.

The leaders of the Soviet Union, although fully aware of the famine in the Ukraine and having complete control of food supplies within its borders, nevertheless failed to take relief measures to check the famine or to alleviate the catastrophic conditions resulting from it. In complete disregard of international opinion, they ignored the appeals of international organizations and other nations.

More than seven million Ukrainians, and millions of others, died as the consequence of this callous act, which was part of a deliberate policy aimed at crushing the political, cultural, and human rights of the Ukrainian and other peoples by whatever means possible. The devastation of these years continues to leave its mark on the Ukrainian people and has retarded their economic, social, and political development to an enormous extent.

In making this a special day to honor those who were victims of this famine, we Americans are afforded as well another opportunity to honor our own system of government and the freedoms we enjoy and our commitment to the right to self-determination and liberty for all the peoples of the world. In so doing, let us also reaffirm our faith in the spirit and resilience of the Ukrainian people and condemn the system that has caused them so much suffering over the years.

The Congress, by House Concurrent Resolution 111, has urged the President to issue a proclamation in mournful commemoration of the great famine in the Ukraine during 1933.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Sunday, November 4, 1984, as a Day of Commemoration of the Great Famine in the Ukraine in 1933.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:04 p.m., October 31, 1984]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on October 31.

Proclamation 5274 -- National Drunk and Drugged Driving Awareness Week, 1984

October 30, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Driving impaired by alcohol or other drugs is one of our Nation's most serious public health and safety problems. Each year, drunk drivers account for tens of thousands of highway fatalities and hundreds of thousands of injuries.

This senseless carnage on our highways can be reduced through increased awareness of what can be done and a willingness to get involved in doing the right thing. We must not wait until personal tragedy strikes to become involved. It is too late for those who have already become the victims of the drunk drivers.

Strict law enforcement and just penalties are essential. Contrary to popular opinion, driving is not a right, but a privilege -- which can and should be withdrawn when a drunken driver deliberately endangers others. We also need improved means of detecting intoxicated drivers before they cause an accident.

Statistics show that in many alcohol-related accidents, our young people are either the cause or the victim. In recognition of the considerable evidence that raising the legal drinking age reduces alcohol-related motor vehicle crash involvement among young drivers, the Federal government is encouraging each State to establish 21 as the minimum age at which individuals may purchase, possess, or consume alcoholic beverages. Many States have already raised the legal drinking age as a result of efforts of dedicated citizen volunteers and the growing awareness that motor vehicle accidents are the leading cause of death among young people.

We need informed, concerned citizens who are willing to get involved in generating awareness, education, and action to eliminate drunk and drugged drivers from our highways. With the continued involvement of private citizens working together, and action at all levels of government, we can begin to control the problem of drunken and drugged driving.

As the Presidential Commission on Drunk Driving recommended, we are seeking a long-term sustained effort that brings to bear the resources of our local, State and national levels of government. To that end, a National Commission on Drunk Driving has been formed to continue the work of the Presidential Commission.

In order to encourage citizen involvement in prevention efforts and to increase awareness of the seriousness of the threat to our lives and safety, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 303, has designated the week of December 9 through 15, 1984, as ``National Drunk and Drugged Driving Awareness Week.''

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of December 9 through 15, 1984, as National Drunk and Drugged Driving Awareness Week. I call upon each American to help make the difference between the needless tragedy of alcohol-related accidents and the blessings of health and life. I ask all Americans to remember and to urge others not to drink or take drugs and drive.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:05 p.m., October 31, 1984]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on October 31.