Proclamation 5288 -- Wright Brothers Day, 1984

December 12, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

This year marks the eighty-first anniversary of human flight in a powered, winged aircraft. The dedicated efforts of Orville and Wilbur Wright made this possible. In the years that have passed since that time, the world has undergone a revolution in transportation that has brought nations closer together and helped unite the global community in ways never before possible.

Though only 120 feet in length and 12 seconds in duration, the first successful flight of the Wright Brothers' aero-vehicle on December 17, 1903, was truly the ``flight heard round the world.'' That flight -- limited in immediate, practical application but infinite in conceptual progress -- helped foster the Nation's spirit of innovation and dedication to technological advancement. This spirit has thrust the United States into world leadership in all facets of aviation, both civil and military. Aviation in the United States and throughout the world continues to build on the foundation provided by the Wright Brothers.

To commemorate the historic achievement of the Wright Brothers, the Congress, by joint resolution of December 17, 1963 (77 Stat. 402; 36 U.S.C. 169), has designated the seventeenth day of December of each year as Wright Brothers Day and requested the President to issue annually a proclamation inviting the people of the United States to observe that day with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim December 17, 1984, as Wright Brothers Day, and I call upon the people of this Nation and local and national governmental officials to observe this day with appropriate ceremonies and activities, both to recall the accomplishments of the Wright Brothers and to provide a stimulus to aviation in this country and throughout the world.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth day of December, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 2:35 p.m., December 12, 1984]