Proclamations, April 9, 1984

Proclamation 5175 -- Law Day U.S.A., 1984

April 9, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

May 1, 1984 is Law Day U.S.A., a time to affirm the essential role of the rule of law in the development and preservation of our free society.

This year's Law Day theme, ``Law Makes Freedom Work,'' captures the essence of our heritage as a Republic. Our unique experience demonstrates that law and freedom must be indivisible partners. For without law, there can be no freedom, only chaos and disorder; and without freedom, law is but a cynical veneer for injustice and oppression.

The guarantees of freedom embodied in our Constitution and the Bill of Rights are a continuing legacy, enhancing the lives of our citizens and serving as an inspiration to people around the world. One of our Nation's strongest principles is that voluntary adherence to the rule of law expands, rather than limits, the opportunities for freedom.

For twenty-seven years, we have set aside this day as a time for reflection upon and celebration of the vital bond between liberty and the rule of law that gives life to our national goals and ideals. It is also an opportunity for all Americans to improve their understanding and appreciation of the contribution law makes to the preservation of freedom.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, in accordance with Public Law 87 - 20 of April 7, 1961, do hereby proclaim Tuesday, May 1, 1984 as Law Day U.S.A. I urge the people of the United States to use this occasion to renew their commitment to the rule of law and to reaffirm our dedication to the partnership of law and liberty. I also urge the legal profession, schools, civic, service and fraternal organizations, public bodies, libraries, the courts, the communications media, business, the clergy, and all interested individuals and organizations to join in efforts to focus attention on the need for the rule of law. I also call upon all public officials to display the flag of the United States on all government buildings open on Law Day, May 1, 1984.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:58 a.m., April 10, 1984]

Proclamation 5176 -- Parkinson's Disease Awareness Week, 1984

April 9, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

For most of us, movement is part of our lives which, though essential, we often take for granted. But for nearly half a million Americans, every step, every gesture is fraught with apprehension. These people suffer from Parkinson's disease, a movement disorder that affects people as they grow older.

We now know that the tremor and rigidity characteristic of Parkinson's disease are caused by a chemical deficiency in the part of the brain that controls movement. Through research, scientists have discovered that certain drugs can help overcome this deficiency. Many Americans with Parkinson's disease have found that with medication, physical therapy, and emotional support from families and friends, they can lead normal and productive lives.

Superbly trained scientists are hard at work trying to solve the problems caused by Parkinson's disease. Many of these scientists are supported by the Federal government's National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and by four national voluntary health organizations: the American Parkinson Disease Association, the National Parkinson Foundation, Inc., the Parkinson's Disease Foundation, and the United Parkinson Foundation.

While these medical advances are encouraging, it is important that there be greater public awareness of what it means to have Parkinson's disease. We must let people with Parkinson's disease know that we understand when they have trouble walking through a doorway or when the disorder causes their hands or their heads to shake uncontrollably. A smile may be all the encouragement they need to relax enough to resume normal movement. I commend the courage of Americans who refuse to be vanquished by Parkinson's disease. And I applaud the resourcefulness of the families and friends who provide them with sustained affection and encouragement.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 263, has designated the week of April 8 - 14, 1984, as ``Parkinson's Disease Awareness Week'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of that week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of April 8 - 14, 1984, as ``Parkinson's Disease Awareness Week,'' and I call upon Government agencies and the people of the United States to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:59 a.m., April 10, 1984]

Note: The President signed the proclamation at a ceremony in the Oval Office at the White House.