Proclamations, April 13, 1984

Proclamation 5177 -- National Hearing Impaired Awareness Week, 1984

April 13, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

More than fifteen million Americans of all ages experience some degree and form of hearing impairment. These hearing-impaired Americans continue to share in the life of the Nation, contribute to family life and the home, and provide civic support to their communities. They have steadfastly striven not only to overcome their handicaps, but also to assist other members of our society. In so doing, the deaf and hearing impaired have made significant contributions to society, science, the arts and industry in virtually every field.

Research has shown us that hearing loss can sometimes be alleviated, corrected, or best of all, prevented. Scientific investigators supported by the Federal government's National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and by professional societies and voluntary health organizations are learning more about how the auditory system works, and what can go wrong and why. Innovative programs in research, education, and prevention have long been conducted and supported by many voluntary agencies working on behalf of the hearing impaired. I commend their dedication to this important service.

The Congress, by House Joint Resolution 407, has designated the week beginning April 8, 1984, as ``National Hearing Impaired Awarenesss Week,'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of that week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning April 8, 1984, as National Hearing Impaired Awareness Week. I call upon the people of the United States to observe this week with appropriate activities in their homes, offices, schools, and communities, and I urge all Americans to reflect upon the important contributions made by the hearing-impaired citizens to the progress and well-being of our country.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 13th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:05 p.m., April 13, 1984]

Proclamation 5178 -- Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week, 1984

April 13, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The great strength of America lies in the determination and caring hearts of our people. Reflecting diverse backgrounds and the experiences of all our citizens, this Nation is a hearty amalgam of individuals united in their commitment to freedom.

Americans who have come from Asian and Pacific countries have added a special quality to the United States. They have made outstanding contributions to our Nation's progress in a wide range of fields, including science, the arts, medicine, law, literature, agriculture, industry and commerce, and government. Bringing with them the strong and varied traditions and heritages of their Asian and Pacific homelands, they have greatly enriched America's culture and institutions.

This Nation owes a debt of gratitude to the Asian and Pacific immigrants. Their desire for liberty strengthens and underscores our own.

As we celebrate the accomplishments of Asian and Pacific Americans, we dedicate ourselves to overcoming the legacy of past discrimination, knowing that the struggle for full participation and equal opportunity goes on. We are grateful to Asian and Pacific Americans for their enduring belief in the inalienable rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning May 5, 1984, as Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week and call upon all the people of the United States to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 13th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:06 p.m., April 13, 1984]

Proclamation 5179 -- National Maritime Day, 1984

April 13, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

On March 20, 1984, I signed into law the Shipping Act of 1984. This important legislation removed several burdensome and unnecessary Government regulations restricting both United States-flag and foreign-flag ocean common carriers operating in the foreign commerce of the United States. This is the most significant ocean regulatory legislation since the enactment of the Shipping Act in 1916.

The United States is the greatest trading nation in the world, and this landmark legislation will provide for more flexible and responsive ocean transportation services, including intermodal service, that will benefit both our exporters and importers. United States flag-ocean carriers will benefit by being assured evenhanded regulatory treatment with foreign competitors. The Shipping Act of 1984 represents but one part of my Administration's commitment to foster and maintain the United States-flag merchant marine required by this great Nation for our national security and economic benefit.

In recognition of the importance of the American merchant marine, the Congress, by joint resolution of May 20, 1933, designated May 22 as National Maritime Day and requested the President to issue annually a proclamation calling for its appropriate observance. This date was chosen to commemorate the day in 1819 when the SS SAVANNAH departed Savannah, Georgia, on the first transatlantic steamship voyage.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 22, 1984, as National Maritime Day, and I urge the people of the United States to observe this day by displaying the flag of the United States at their homes and other suitable places, and I request that all ships sailing under the American flag dress ship on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 13th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:07 p.m., April 13, 1984]

Proclamation 5180 -- Prayer for Peace, Memorial Day, May 28, 1984

April 13, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

In the course of America's existence, our citizens too often have been called upon to make the ultimate sacrifice for the cause of peace, freedom, and justice. From Bunker Hill to Beirut, these brave men and women have passed into the hands of our Creator so that we may enjoy the fruits of liberty. As Americans gather this Memorial Day to pay homage to their sacred memory and selfless commitment, we can offer no higher praise than that these patriots defended the high ideals bestowed upon this Nation by our Founding Fathers.

Today, as we commend their deeds, we also bear a heavy burden of responsibility to ensure that their sacrifice was not in vain by never wavering in our dedication and determination to maintain the peace, to safeguard human rights, and to protect the economic well-being of our Nation for future generations.

In honor and recognition of those Americans to whom we pay tribute today, the Congress, by joint resolution of May 11, 1950 (64 Stat. 158), has requested the President to issue a proclamation calling upon the people of the United States to observe each Memorial Day as a day of prayer for permanent peace and designating a period on that day when the people of the United States might unite in prayer.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Memorial Day, May 28, 1984, as a day of prayer for permanent peace, and I designate the hour beginning in each locality at 11 o'clock in the morning of that day as a time to unite in prayer. I urge the press, radio, television, and all other information media to cooperate in this observance.

I also request the Governors of the United States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the appropriate officials of all units of government to direct that the flag be flown at half-staff during this Memorial Day on all buildings, grounds, and naval vessels throughout the United States and in all areas under its jurisdiction and control, and I request the people of the United States to display the flag at half-staff from their homes for the customary forenoon period.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 13th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:08 p.m., April 13, 1984]

Proclamation 5181 -- Education Day, U.S.A., 1984

April 13, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Throughout our history, Americans have recognized that education is vital to our Nation's future. Our educational system has always done far more than simply train people for a given job or profession; it has equipped generation upon generation of young men and women for lives of responsible citizenship, by helping to teach them the basic ethical values and principles that are both our heritage as a free people and the foundation of civilized life.

As the beneficiaries of that heritage, we bear a corresponding responsibility to ensure that the moral values on which freedom rests continue to be transmitted to each successive generation of Americans. If our educational efforts are rooted in first principles -- that human life is sacred; that men and women should be treated as individuals, with certain fundamental rights and responsibilities; that respect for law is crucial to the survival of freedom -- then our children and our children's children will share, as we have, in the blessings of liberty.

The Lubavitch movement, headed by Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, has provided people of all faiths a shining example of the true value of education. The Lubavitcher Rebbe's work is a living reminder that knowledge is worthy only when accompanied by moral and spiritual wisdom and understanding. In fostering and promoting a tradition of ethical values that can trace its roots to the Seven Noahide Laws, which have often been cited as universal norms of ethical conduct and a guarantee of fundamental human rights, the Lubavitch movement and its greatly respected leader have shown Americans of every faith that true education involves not simply what one knows, but how one lives.

In recognition of Rabbi Schneerson's contributions and in honor of his 82nd birthday on the 11th day of the Jewish month Nisan, which falls this year on April 13, the Congress, by House Joint Resolution 520, has designated April 13, 1984, as ``Education Day, U.S.A.,'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue an appropriate proclamation.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim April 13, 1984, as Education Day, U.S.A., and I call upon the people of the United States, and in particular our teachers and other educational leaders, to observe that day with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 13th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:57 a.m., April 16, 1984]

Proclamation 5182 -- Crime Victims Week, 1984

April 13, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

As citizens of this free Nation, we support a system of justice which protects the rights of the accused by ensuring them due process of law, a just and fair guarantee inscribed into our Constitution. Yet, through ignorance and insensitivity, our criminal justice system has often failed to provide the victims of crime the compassionate treatment they deserve. These persons too often have had to endure alone the physical and emotional pain that crime inflicts upon its victims. Victims of crime have had their lives threatened and disrupted, and their families have been subjected to unnecessary strains. Victims sometimes fear the loss of their livelihood, health, or life, and, most importantly, their cries for elementary justice too frequently go unheard.

Among the essential reasons governments are instituted among peoples is to establish a system of justice for the protection of their citizens. Justice is a primary goal and responsibility of government. As a country founded with the noble purpose of protecting and defending its people, our society cannot ignore the pleas of crime victims. Guided by recommendations of the President's Task Force on Victims of Crime, my Administration is working to implement much-needed changes throughout our criminal justice system to respond to the concerns of crime victims.

The national movement seeking more compassionate treatment for the victims of crime is led in large part by the victims themselves. I commend these courageous men and women who have overcome their pain and despair and are working to help ease the trauma of other victims. But it is crucial to remember that no segment of our society should refuse to recognize its responsibility to help in this most worthy endeavor. We must all strive to preserve the principles of justice on which our free society depends.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning April 15, 1984, as Crime Victims Week. I urge officials at all levels of government to pay special attention to the burdens crime victims face. I ask that all Americans listen and respond to the needs of crime victims, who urgently require and deserve our support.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 13th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:58 a.m., April 16, 1984]

Note: The President signed the proclamation at a ceremony in the Oval Office at the White House.