Proclamations, May 5, 1984

Proclamation 5187 -- National Correctional Officers Week, 1984

May 5, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Correctional officers have the difficult and often dangerous assignment of ensuring the custody, safety and well-being of the over 600,000 inmates in our Nation's prisons and jails. Their position is essential to the day-to-day operations of these institutions; without them it would be impossible to achieve the foremost institutional goals of security and control.

Historically, correctional officers have been viewed as ``guards,'' occupying isolated and misunderstood positions in prisons and jails. In recent years, the duties of these officers have become increasingly complex and demanding. They are called upon to fill, simultaneously, custodial, supervisory and counseling roles. The professionalism, dedication and courage exhibited by these officers throughout the performance of these demanding and often conflicting roles deserve our utmost respect. The important work of correctional officers often does not receive the recognition from the public it deserves. It is appropriate that we honor the many contributions and accomplishments of these men and women who are a vital component of the field of corrections.

In recognition of the contributions of correctional officers to our Nation, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 132, has designated the week beginning May 6, 1984, as ``National Correctional Officers Week,'' and authorized and requested the President to issue an appropriate proclamation.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning May 6, 1984, as National Correctional Officers Week. I call upon officials of State and local governments and the people of the United States to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:50 p.m., May 7, 1984]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on May 7.

Proclamation 5188 -- National Photo Week, 1984

May 5, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Photography, the prime visual recorder of human events, preserves memories, emotion, and sentiment for virtually all Americans. It is an established and growing art form which communicates the beauty and diversity of America as well as the vitality of its culture and its people.

Photography has played an important role in our commercial and artistic lives and in the process of government through motion pictures, video cameras, and still shots. Photographs preserve the history of the Nation and the changing panorama of American landscape and culture. Visual records also contribute to the advancement of many fields of science, technology, and inquiry, including communications, meteorology, geography, medicine, justice, astronomy and agriculture.

To honor the invaluable contribution that photography has made to the quality of our life, the Congress has, by Senate Joint Resolution 250, designated the week of May 7 through May 13, 1984, as ``National Photo Week'' and has authorized the President to issue a proclamation in honor of that occasion.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 7 through May 13, 1984, as National Photo Week, and I call upon the American people to engage in appropriate observances to reflect our appreciation and understanding of the value of photography to the Nation.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:51 p.m., May 7, 1984]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on May 7.

Proclamation 5189 -- National Defense Transportation Day and National Transportation Week, 1984

May 5, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

America's transportation systems are a mainstay of our economy, an essential component of our commerce, an important part of our defense and the means by which our citizens and visitors alike enjoy the freedom to travel throughout our land.

Historically, transportation has opened America's frontiers. Transportation gave our Nation's territorial and industrial pioneers access to the country's resources. More than any other element of our society, transportation has been a vibrant economic catalyst, building cities, generating new industries, spurring ambitions, providing jobs and linking us to the peoples of the world. Our transportation systems and facilities, including America's merchant fleet and road, rail and aviation networks, support the Nation's defense readiness and emergency response capabilities.

As our transportation systems have developed, they have become increasingly safe. The constant commitment to safety, shared by the government and the private sector, is reducing fatalities and accident rates to the lowest levels in our history, saving lives and preventing injuries.

As we vigorously pursue safety efforts, the Federal government is relaxing the constraints of economic regulation, enabling the Nation's rail, airline, trucking and interstate bus companies to compete more aggressively and operate more efficiently. Economic deregulation is a gateway for new carriers entering the transportation field. It is generating new competition, providing lower fares and more choices for consumers, and competitive rates for shippers. America's transportation industries stand today on the threshold of an era of broader opportunities and greater prosperity. We stand, as well, at the beginning of a new era of space transportation, in which the Federal government is fully prepared to assist the private sector in development of a commercial space industry.

In recognition of the importance of transportation in America and to honor the millions of Americans who serve and supply our transportation needs, the Congress, by joint resolution approved May 16, 1957, has requested that the third Friday in May of each year be designated National Defense Transportation Day; and by a joint resolution approved May 14, 1962, that the week in which that Friday falls be proclaimed National Transportation Week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Friday, May 18, 1984, as National Defense Transportation Day and proclaim the week beginning May 13, 1984, as National Transportation Week. I urge the people of the United States to observe these occasions with appropriate ceremonies which will give full recognition to the importance of our transportation system and the maintenance of its facilities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:52 p.m., May 7, 1984]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on May 7.