Proclamations, May 9, 1984

Proclamation 5191 -- National Tuberous Sclerosis Week, 1984

May 9, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Few Americans have heard of tuberous sclerosis, but for an estimated 10,000 of us, this disease and its devastating effects are all too real. For these people, life is a perpetual struggle with convulsive seizures, mental retardation, tumors throughout the body, and other physical handicaps. Because tuberous sclerosis is hereditary, its threat extends to future generations; children of those afflicted with it stand a 50 percent chance of developing the disease themselves.

Tuberous sclerosis has no known cause or cure. Early detection, accurate diagnosis, careful use of anticonvulsant drugs, and support of family and friends can go far in helping a victim cope with the disease. Research to help us learn how to treat, cure, and prevent this dread disease is being supported by the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and by two voluntary health agencies -- the National Tuberous Sclerosis Association and the Tuberous Sclerosis Association of America. Through this sponsorship, scientists across America are working diligently to find a way to track down the gene responsible for the disease, to develop more effective drug therapies for patients, and to discover ways to improve diagnosis.

I urge all Americans to become aware of the pressing national need to overcome the scourge of tuberous sclerosis. In doing so, we can all help our courageous fellow citizens to lead more comfortable and productive lives at home, at school, or in the workplace.

To enhance the public's understanding of the seriousness of this disease, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 148, has authorized and requested the President to designate the week of May 6 through 13, 1984, as ``National Tuberous Sclerosis Week.''

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of May 6 through 13, 1984, as National Tuberous Sclerosis Week. I call upon all government agencies, health organizations, communications media, and the people of the United States to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:48 a.m., May 9, 1984]

Proclamation 5192 -- National P.O.W./M.I.A. Recognition Day, 1984

May 9, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Ever since the Revolutionary War, America's men and women have heroically served their country in times of conflict. In each of America's wars, our prisoners of war have been required to make special sacrifices, serving their country under conditions of hardship. Their burden greatly increased when they were treated in violation of the fundamental standards of morality and international codes of conduct for the treatment of prisoners of war.

Our P.O.W.s and M.I.A.s have earned a very special place in the hearts of all Americans because of their selfless devotion to duty and unflinching courage. We must not forget or fail to honor those who have served their country so faithfully.

Our Nation deeply appreciates the acute suffering and pain experienced by the families of our servicemen held captive or missing in action. The loss of a loved one is a tragic situation under any circumstance, but that burden is magnified when the fate of the loved one is unknown. All Americans fully support efforts to end the uncertainties with which they continue to live.

We accept and remember our obligation to these missing servicemen. Until the P.O.W./M.I.A. issue is resolved, it will remain a matter of the highest national priority. On July 20, 1984, the P.O.W./M.I.A. Flag will fly over the White House, the Departments of State and Defense, and the Veterans' Administration as a symbol of our unswerving commitment to achieve the fullest possible accounting for the servicemen and civilians.

By Senate Joint Resolution 171, the Congress has designated July 20, 1984, as ``National P.O.W./M.I.A. Recognition Day.'' On this day, I firmly believe that we should recognize the special debt all Americans owe to our fellow citizens who gave up their freedom in the service of our country and to the families who have undergone a great travail.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Friday, July 20, 1984, as National P.O.W./M.I.A. Recognition Day. I call on all Americans to join in honoring all former American prisoners of war, those still missing, and their families who endured the uncommon sacrifices on behalf of this country. I also call upon State and local officials and private organizations to observe this day with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 9th. day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:23 p.m., May 10, 1984]

Note: The text of the proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on May 10.