Proclamations, May 31, 1984

Proclamation 5201 -- National Physical Fitness and Sports Month, 1984

May 31, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Regular, vigorous physical activity is essential to good health and effective performance of our daily responsibilities. In addition, physical activity and sports programs can provide rich sources of personal pleasure and satisfaction.

Many individuals, families, communities, and others are increasingly concerned about physical fitness, and there is a growing recognition that physical activity is an important part of daily life for people of both sexes and all ages. Americans who are not reaping the benefits and pleasures of physical activity and sports should develop a personal physical fitness program in accordance with their capability.

In recognition of the importance of physical activity as a part of our daily life, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 232, has authorized and requested the President to designate the month of May 1984 as ``National Physical Fitness and Sports Month.''

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the month of May 1984 as National Physical Fitness and Sports Month and urge communities, schools, States, employers, voluntary organizations, churches, and other organizations to stage appropriate observances and special events. Furthermore, I urge individuals and families to use this occasion to renew their commitments to make regular physical activity an integral part of their lives.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:56 a.m., May 31, 1984]

Proclamation 5202 -- National Animal Health Week, 1984

May 31, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Unparalleled progress in agricultural production has made the United States the world's food production model. Our ability to conquer disease and advance the health and productivity of our livestock has brought animal scientists and animal production specialists from around the world to our shores to learn the secret of America's agriculture.

A major milestone in this progress was the creation of the Bureau of Animal Industry on May 29, 1884. The efforts of the Bureau, followed by its successor agencies within the United States Department of Agriculture, have resulted in great strides forward to ensure an abundant supply of safe, wholesome animal products.

In today's dynamic economy, it is difficult to remember that these high-quality, healthy animal products have not always been with us. Whenever we enjoy a meal of meat, eggs, or milk, administer a life-improving health supplement, or enjoy a fine leather or wool item, we reap the benefits of persistent hard work over the decades. Without the progress represented by the improved health and productivity of our animals, we, in the United States, would not enjoy these items as we do for a fraction of the cost often paid by the people in other nations.

On this centennial of progress in advancing the health of livestock and production of animals through research and cooperative endeavors, we salute all who have contributed to the progress we enjoy today. The sound, scientific, and humane principles which have guided those in the forefront of this century of progress continue today, not only for livestock and poultry on our farms and ranches, but also for the care and feeding of our pets and wildlife.

To emphasize the combined efforts of the Government, private sector organizations, the veterinary profession and producers to combat the health hazards experienced in the past by the animal industry, the Congress, by House Joint Resolution 526, has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation designating the week beginning May 27, 1984, as ``National Animal Health Week.''

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning May 27, 1984, as National Animal Health Week. I encourage all Americans to observe this week by participating in appropriate ceremonies and activities planned by government agencies, individuals, and private sector organizations and institutions throughout the country to recognize the great strides made during the past century with animal health.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:57 a.m., May 31, 1984]

Proclamation 5203 -- National Theatre Week, 1984

May 31, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Theatres enrich the lives of all Americans. They have pioneered the way for many performers and have given them a start in artistic careers. Theatres enable their audiences to take part in the creative process; they challenge and stimulate us and show us our world in a new light. The strength and vitality of America's theatres are proof of our dedication and commitment to this vital art form.

Americans in all parts of the country have made theatre a part of their lives. We participate as performers and audience members in schools, community theatres, and at the professional level. Through these efforts, we have nourished an art form that proudly celebrates the diversity and creativity of all our people.

In recognition of the many contributions theatres make to the quality of our lives, and in celebration of this art form which enriches us in so many ways, the Congress, by House Joint Resolution 292, has designated the week of June 3 through June 9, 1984, as ``National Theatre Week,'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of June 3 through June 9, 1984, as National Theatre Week. I encourage the people of the United States to observe the week with appropriate ceremonies, programs, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:58 a.m., May 31, 1984]

Proclamation 5204 -- Flag Day and National Flag Week, 1984

May 31, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Over two hundred years ago, in June 1775, the first distinctive American flags to be used in battle were flown by the colonists at the Battle of Bunker Hill. One flag was an adaptation of the British Blue Ensign, while the other was a new design. Both flags bore a common device of the colonial era which symbolized the experience of Americans who had wrested their land from the forest: the pine tree.

Other flags appeared at the same time, as the colonies moved toward a final separation from Great Britain. Two featured a rattlesnake, symbolizing vigilance and deadly striking power. One bore the legend ``Liberty or Death''; the other ``Don't Tread on Me.'' The Grand Union flag was raised over Washington's Continental Army headquarters on January 1, 1776. It displayed not only the British crosses of St. Andrew and St. George, but also thirteen red and white stripes to symbolize the American colonies. The Bennington flag also appeared in 1776, with thirteen stars, thirteen stripes, and the number ``76.''

Two years after the Battle of Bunker Hill, on June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress chose a flag which tellingly expressed the unity and resolve of the brave colonists who had banded together to seek independence. The delegates voted ``that the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field representing a new constellation.''

After more than two centuries of history, and with the addition of thirty-seven stars, the Stars and Stripes chosen by the Continental Congress in 1777 is our flag today, symbolizing a shared commitment to freedom and equality.

To commemorate the adoption of our flag, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved August 3, 1949 (63 Stat. 492), designated June 14 of each year as Flag Day and requested the President to issue an annual proclamation calling for its observance and the display of the Flag of the United States on all government buildings. The Congress also requested the President, by a joint resolution of June 9, 1966 (80 Stat. 194), to issue annually a proclamation designating the week in which June 14 occurs as National Flag Week and calling upon all citizens of the United States to display the flag during that week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week beginning Sunday, June 10, 1984, as National Flag Week, and I direct the appropriate officials of the government to display the flag on all government buildings during this week. I urge all Americans to observe Flag Day, June 14, and National Flag Week by flying the Stars and Stripes from their homes and other suitable places.

I also urge the American people to celebrate those days from Flag Day through Independence Day, set aside by Congress as a time to honor America (89 Stat. 211), by having public gatherings and activities at which they can honor their country in an appropriate manner.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 1:11 p.m., May 31, 1984]

Proclamation 5205 -- Citizenship Day and Constitution Week, 1984

May 31, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

September 17, 1984, marks the 197th anniversary of the signing of our Constitution. As the bicentennial of this dynamic and timeless document nears, all Americans should become reacquainted with its role as our great country's guiding beacon. With this document as its blueprint, this Nation has become the finest example in history of the principle of government by law, in which every individual is guaranteed certain inalienable rights. Exemplifying this precept, a newly naturalized citizen once wrote:

``After our arrival here we very soon realized that the U.S.A. is really a wonderland: It is the first one among the few countries in the world where liberty, justice, democracy, and happiness are not only not empty slogans, but real benefits for all; where the Constitution is still as valid as it was in those days when the people of the U.S.A. ordained and established it in order to secure the blessings of liberty for themselves and their posterity. It was just natural that our next wish could not be other than to become a citizen of this wonderful country.

``And now, a few minutes after we solemnly pledged allegiance to the flag of the United States, we have just one more wish, that may God give us a long life, and ability to help at our very best in holding this flag straight up, flying as free and clear forever as it has been doing from the beginning of this country.''

The Constitution provides a framework for our continuous striving to make a better America. It provides the basic balance between each branch of government, limits the power of that government, and guarantees to each of us as citizens our most basic rights. The Constitution, however, is only the outline of our system of government. It is through each individual citizen living out the ideals of the Constitution that we reach for a full expression of those ideals. Therefore, while we celebrate Citizenship Day and Constitution Week, let us rededicate ourselves to a full realization of the potential of the great country which the Founding Fathers struggled to create more than two hundred years ago.

Once each year, on September 17, all four pages of the original signed Constitution are placed on public exhibition in the Rotunda of the National Archives building in Washington, DC. I encourage all Americans to take the opportunity to view this document, which embodies our national commitment to freedom.

In recognition of the importance of our Constitution and the role of our citizenry in shaping our government, the Congress, by joint resolution of February 29, 1952 (36 U.S.C. 153), designated September 17th of each year as Citizenship Day and authorized the President to issue annually a proclamation calling upon officials of the government to display the flag on all government buildings on that day. The Congress also, by joint resolution of August 2, 1956 (36 U.S.C. 159), requested the President to proclaim the week beginning September 17th and ending September 23rd of each year as Constitution Week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, call upon appropriate government officials to display the flag of the United States on all government buildings on Citizenship Day, September 17, 1984. I urge Federal, State and local officials, as well as leaders of civic, educational and religious organizations to conduct ceremonies and programs that day to commemorate the occasion.

I also proclaim the week beginning September 17 and ending September 23, 1984, as Constitution Week, and I urge all Americans to observe that week with appropriate ceremonies and activities in their schools, churches and other suitable places.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 1:12 p.m., May 31, 1984]

Proclamation 5206 -- D-day National Remembrance

May 31, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

On Tuesday, June 6, 1944, General Dwight D. Eisenhower made a dramatic announcement from London:

``People of Western Europe: A landing was made this morning on the coast of France by troops of the Allied Expeditionary Force. . . . The hour of your liberation is approaching.''

Operation Overlord, the invasion of Adolph Hitler's ``Fortress Europe'' forty years ago, thrust approximately 130,000 American and Allied troops under General Eisenhower's command onto beaches now known to history as Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno, and Sword along the coast of Normandy, France. Another 23,000 British and American airborne forces were parachuted or taken by glider to secure critical inland areas. Some 11,000 sorties were flown by allied aircraft, and innumerable sabotage operations were carried out by Resistance forces behind the lines.

On that day and in the ensuing weeks, the soldiers, sailors, and airmen of the assault forces, and the men and women who supported the landing, displayed great skill, unwavering tenacity, and courage. The Americans who landed at Omaha Beach -- where sharp bluffs, strong defenses, and the presence of a powerful German division produced enormous difficulties -- wrote an especially brave and noble chapter in the military history of the United States.

Opposed by bitter enemy resistance, the landing forces gained the beaches at great sacrifice, pushed inland, and expanded their beachheads. Feats of leadership and courage by individuals and small groups turned the tide. The great battles of 1944 that followed, from the hedgerows to the Ardennes, hold a place of highest honor in the tradition of the United States Armed Forces. The brave, often heroic deeds of our fellow Americans and others in the Allied Armed Forces set in motion the liberation of Europe and brought unity and pride to all free people.

Welded by the experiences of war, the old world and the new formed an enduring alliance which shared the rebuilding of Europe and forged a shield that has kept the peace in Europe for almost forty years. A common dedication to remain strong can continue that peace which these brave men and women fought so hard to secure.

In recognition of the fortieth anniversary of this historic event, the Congress, by H.J. Res. 487, has designated June 6, 1984, as ``D-day National Remembrance'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of that day.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim June 6, 1984, as D-day National Remembrance, a national day commemorating the fortieth anniversary of D-day. I call upon the people of the United States to commemorate the valor of those who served in the D-day assualt forces with appropriate ceremonies and observances.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 31st day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:35 p.m., May 31, 1984]