Proclamations, September 21, 1984

Proclamation 5233 -- National Sewing Month, 1984

September 21, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The home sewing industry is important to our Nation's economy and is an activity shared by many Americans. Approximately fifty million Americans sew at home, and nearly forty million sew at least part of their wardrobe. Their initiative, creativity and self-reliance are characteristic of the people of our Nation.

Sewing at home helps keep down the cost of clothing, and the sewing industry generates over $3,500,000,000 annually for the economy of the United States. Home sewing also enhances the career opportunities of many Americans in fields such as fashion, interior design, patternmaking, retail merchandising and textile design.

In recognition of the importance of home sewing to our Nation, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 302, has designated the month of September 1984 as ``National Sewing Month'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this month.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim September 1984 as National Sewing Month, and I call upon the people of the United States to observe September with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-first day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:15 p.m., September 21, 1984]

Proclamation 5234 -- Youth of America Week, 1984

September 21, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

More than fifty million young Americans contribute to the vitality of our Nation. In their values, aspirations and accomplishments we see reflected not only a rich heritage but a vision of America in the future. It will be a society generous in spirit, strong in character and sincere in purpose -- one in which freedom and opportunity give rise to responsibility and excellence.

Just as young Americans can be proud of their contribution to our Nation, they also share a vital part of the life of the smaller community of the family. In this first school where the values of self-reliance, compassion and initiative are taught, the younger members make special contributions to foster the unique identity and sharing of each family. And they prepare for the time when they too will pass on to a new generation the values of our heritage.

For those young Americans in special need we continue to offer support in a variety of activities within the public and private sectors. These support programs are an investment in our national future, and many of the best of them rely not on large sums of money but on the unpaid service of volunteers who contribute their time and experience to the task of forming the next generation. Just as importantly, young people themselves are one of our best sources of volunteers because their energy and idealism give them a natural motivation to devote themselves to helping others.

To assure the Nation's youth of our commitment to share our knowledge, experience and wisdom as they mature towards a full appreciation of democratic principles, the Congress of the United States, by Senate Joint Resolution 597, has designated the week of September 2 through September 8, 1984, as ``Youth of America Week'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of that week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of September 2 through 8, 1984, as Youth of America Week.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-first day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:16 p.m., September 21, 1984]

Note: The proclamation was not issued as a White House press release.

Proclamation 5235 -- National School-Age Child Care Awareness Week, 1984

September 21, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The care and education of children has always been society's most important task, since a nation's children are its future. The love and instruction young people receive during their formative years help to set their characters for the rest of their lives and so determine the kind of society we all live in.

Patterns of child care are changing rapidly as a majority of women spend part or all of their adult lives as members of the labor force. Yet the need of young people for love and guidance remains as important as ever, and we all have a responsibility to make sure that they continue to receive it.

The Federal government has been actively involved in working with State and local governments, voluntary and nonprofit agencies, and businesses to encourage the creation of appropriate programs for school-age children. The White House Office of Private Sector Initiatives has launched a series of forums for chief executive officers of major corporations to promote increased private sector involvement in child care. The Department of Health and Human Services is also sponsoring a number of initiatives to help American families meet their child care needs. These projects are increasing knowledge through research, demonstrating new program models, making valuable information available to parents and providers, and helping to develop local child care systems.

But today, as in the past, the most important environment forming the characters of our young people is the family. Families face new challenges, but the American family has proved to be a most resilient institution. It remains the primary vehicle by which parents seek to develop their children into healthy and confident adults. The task before us is to strengthen the family and help it when necessary so that it will continue to perform its unique civilizing function.

The Congress of the United States, by House Joint Resolution 544, has designated the week of September 2 through 8, 1984, as ``National School-Age Child Care Awareness Week'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of that week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of September 2 through 8, 1984, as National School-Age Child Care Awareness Week.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-first day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:17 p.m., September 21, 1984]

Note: The proclamation was not issued as a White House press release.

Proclamation 5237 -- Columbus Day, 1984

September 21, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

In October of each year, we are privileged to honor Christopher Columbus, the Italian explorer whose epic voyages to the New World still excite the imagination.

Columbus challenged the unknown when he sailed westward in 1492 with his tiny fleet of ships. Others had preceded him; some indeed may have visited the Western Hemisphere. Yet his discovery of the New World stands as a unique and momentous achievement. His voyages ushered in a new phase in history and enriched mankind with new opportunities. They revolutionized the way man thought of himself and his world. This New World that Columbus revealed to Europe soon came to symbolize hope, freedom, and opportunity for all. A stream of settlers arrived to build a new society out of their dreams of liberty, justice, and economic opportunity.

We Americans will always feel that we stand at the frontier. Today our voyage of discovery continues -- to the vastness of outer space, to the depths of the sea, to the mysteries of life itself. The willingness to strike out in new directions and to take risks is still at work. This spirit has enriched our lives and expanded our horizons. Thus, it is appropriate that we, both as Americans and as Columbus' spiritual heirs, should take inspiration from his blend of daring, skill, enterprise, and imagination.

All Americans share in admiring Columbus' achievement. But those of Italian descent can take particular pride in honoring this bold son of Genoa who set forth in the service of Spain in search of the unknown. A host of other Italians have followed Columbus to this land, lending their talents and helping to create an unparalleled society of freedom and opportunity. This day is one of justifiable pride for Italy and Italians everywhere, and it symbolizes the respect we Americans have for our rich inheritance from the Old World.

In tribute to Columbus' achievement, the Congress of the United States, by joint resolution approved April 30, 1934 (48 Stat. 657), as modified by the Act of June 28, 1968 (82 Stat. 250), has requested the President to proclaim the second Monday in October of each year as Columbus Day.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Monday, October 8, 1984, as Columbus Day. I invite the people of this Nation to observe that day in schools, churches, and other suitable places with appropriate ceremonies in honor of this great explorer. I also direct that the flag of the United States be displayed on all public buildings on the appointed day in memory of Christopher Columbus.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-first day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:19 p.m., September 21, 1984]

Proclamation 5238 -- Leif Erikson Day, 1984

September 21, 1984

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

In the year 1000, Leif Erikson, charged by King Olav to convert the Nordic settlers in Greenland, set sail to the west. A terrible storm forced his vessel off course, and he came upon lands of which there was no previous knowledge. He found ``fields of self-sown wheat'' and a country rich with grapes and timber. His early explorations are a tribute to the indomitable and inquisitive spirit so characteristic of the Nordic peoples.

Leif Erikson could not have known at the time of his voyage how intermingled the fate and fortune of the Nordic peoples and the new land would become. During the nineteenth century and early part of the twentieth, millions of Erikson's descendants would join the great current of European migration to the United States. Brave pioneers from Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Iceland helped push the American frontier to the west, building communities and farms and enriching American life and culture. Others worked long and hard contributing to the great industries of the Northeast. Their accomplishments constitute a proud monument to the Nordic-American heritage and to the development of our country. Democratic ideals, an abiding faith in the value of ingenuity and hard work, and a deep belief in the sanctity of the individual are among the many values and principles we share. Because of the exstensive commerce and exchange of ideas and people between the United States and the Nordic region, we have enjoyed friendship, understanding, and appreciation for each other.

To commemorate the courage of Leif Erikson and in recognition of our long and fruitful relationship with the Nordic peoples, the Congress of the United States, by joint resolution approved September 2, 1964 (78 Stat. 849, 36 U.S.C. 169c), authorized the President to proclaim October 9 in each year as Leif Erikson Day.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate October 9, 1984, as Leif Erikson Day, and I direct the appropriate government officials to display the flag of the United States on all government buildings that day. I also invite the people of the United States to honor Leif Erikson by holding appropriate exercises and ceremonies in suitable places throughout the land.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-first day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:20 p.m., September 21, 1984]