Proclamations, October 9, 1985

Proclamation 5380 -- Fire Prevention Week, 1985

October 9, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Fire controlled is one of man's greatest friends; unchecked, it is our deadly enemy. Each year, millions of fires kill thousands of Americans and destroy billions of dollars of property.

Carelessness and apathy are fire's greatest allies. But an informed public aware of fire hazards and ways to prevent and combat fire can bring the problem under control.

Thanks to the efforts in both the public and private sectors, our annual fire loss has been declining in recent years. But we must not become complacent. We must build on the progress that has been made.

I urge every American to join the fight against fire. During Fire Prevention Week, communities should begin initiatives for fire prevention and control that can be implemented throughout the year. I encourage all citizens to join in local efforts to marshal the forces of the entire community -- local government, the fire service, business leaders, civic organizations, and service groups -- to redouble their efforts to prevent and control fire and minimize its toll of life and property.

One place we can all start is with this year's Fire Prevention Week theme, ``Fire Drills Save Lives.'' Everyone should plan ahead noting the most convenient fire exits. Families should install and maintain smoke detectors in their homes to provide early warning of fire. Your local fire fighters can provide you with more detailed recommendations and will be happy to do so. And let us not forget to thank them for the great job they do to protect us, our homes, our businesses, and our belongings. Daily they risk their lives to protect our communities. It is most fitting that the culmination of National Fire Prevention Week will be the observance of the National Fallen Firefighter Memorial Service in Emmitsburg, Maryland. The observance will honor the scores of brave firefighters who last year gave their lives in service to others.

We also must recognize and commend the efforts of all organizations concerned with fire prevention and control, and in particular the National Fire Protection Association, the International Association of Firefighters, the International Association of Fire Chiefs, the National Volunteer Fire Council, the International Society of Fire Service Instructors, the Fire Marshals Association of North America, and all the members of the Joint Council of National Fire Service Organizations.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of October 6, 1985, as Fire Prevention Week, and I call upon the people of the United States to plan and actively participate in fire prevention activities during this week and throughout the year.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:29 a.m., October 10, 1985]

Proclamation 5381 -- National School Lunch Week, 1985

October 9, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Since 1946, the National School Lunch Program has made it possible for our Nation's children to enjoy nutritious, well-balanced, low-cost lunches. Now in its 39th year, the National School Lunch Program stands as an outstanding example of a successful partnership between Federal and State governments and local communities to make food and technical assistance available in an effort to provide a more nutritious diet for students.

The youth of our Nation are our greatest resource, and the school lunch program demonstrates our commitment to the promotion of their health and well-being. Under its auspices, over 23 million lunches are served daily in nearly 90,000 schools throughout the country. The success of this effort is largely due to resourceful and creative food service managers and staff, working in cooperation with government personnel, parents, teachers, and members of civic groups.

By joint resolution approved October 9, 1962, the Congress has designated the week beginning on the second Sunday of October in each year as ``National School Lunch Week'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of that week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning October 13, 1985, as National School Lunch Week, and I call upon all Americans to give special and deserved recognition to those people at the State and local level who, through their dedicated and innovative efforts, have contributed so much to the success of the school lunch program.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:31 a.m., October 10, 1985]

Proclamation 5382 -- White Cane Safety Day, 1985

October 9, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Americans admire courage and respect independence. Every day some of our neighbors renew our appreciation of these qualities. They are the Americans who set forth about their daily business bearing the white cane.

The white cane is the badge of courage carried by those blind and visually impaired citizens who believe freedom and independence are meant for all Americans. The white cane tells the world that its bearer expects not pity but fairness and consideration -- on the street, on the job, and everywhere Americans' paths cross.

In recognition of the significance of the white cane, the Congress, by joint resolution approved October 6, 1964, has authorized the President to designate October 15 of each year as ``White Cane Safety Day.''

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim October 15, 1985, as White Cane Safety Day. I urge all Americans to salute the courage of those who carry the white cane and consider how each of us, in our work and in our daily rounds, can show our respect for these proud and able Americans.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:32 a.m., October 10, 1985]

Proclamation 5383 -- National Spina Bifida Month, 1985

October 9, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Spina bifida is one of the most common birth defects. It affects between one and two of every 1,000 babies born in the United States. Infants with spina bifida may have partially developed spinal cords and often suffer nerve damage, muscle paralysis, and spine and limb deformities. Most develop hydrocephalus -- a potentially dangerous buildup of fluid and pressure within the brain.

A generation ago, the majority of children with spina bifida died. Today, their survival rate and long-term outlook have improved dramatically. Carefully planned programs of biomedical research have led to advances in neurosurgery that help alleviate some physical problems. Through research, physicians now are able to control brain and bladder infections more effectively. Scientists have also developed lighter braces and splints to give patients greater mobility.

Further improvements in treating this crippling birth defect can be expected to result from research supported by the Federal government's National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Achieving the long-sought goal of prevention now appears more likely. Collaborating in this vital effort are a number of private, voluntary health agencies including the Spina Bifida Association of America, the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, and the National Easter Seal Society. The combined energies of these Federal and private agencies assure the Nation of continued progress toward the conquest of spina bifida.

So that we as a Nation may increase our sensitivity to the needs of spina bifida children and the difficulties faced by their parents, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 111, has designated October 1985 as ``National Spina Bifida Month'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this month.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim October 1985 as National Spina Bifida Month, and I call upon all government agencies, health organizations, and the people of the United States to observe this month with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:05 a.m., October 11, 1985]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on October 10.

Proclamation 5384 -- Oil Heat Centennial Year, 1985

October 9, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

It was just 100 years ago that American ingenuity developed oil heat as a practical reality. On August 11, 1885, the Patent Office granted to David H. Burrell of Little Falls, New York, a patent for the first technically sound oil burner -- a furnace that could burn liquid and gaseous fuels. By 1893 oil burners were used for the first time in major public exhibit buildings at the Columbian Exposition in Chicago. By the 1970s oil burner technology had been adapted to the heating needs of more than 15 million Americans, providing comfort for homes, schools, businesses, and factories.

There is hardly an area of the Nation where this great resource has not been a critical development factor. The oil heat industry is, and always has been, made up of a large and diverse group of competitive small businesses, many of which are in the forefront of the new energy-efficient technologies of the 1980s. They are helping develop higher-efficiency oil heat, new conservation techniques, solar heating, and other technologies.

In recognition of the many thousands of men and women who have contributed to this important industry in our Nation over the past 100 years, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 115, has designated 1985 as ``Oil Heat Centennial Year'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation to commemorate this event.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim 1985 as Oil Heat Centennial Year. I call upon the people of the United States to observe the occasion with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:06 a.m., October 11, 1985]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on October 10.