Proclamations, October 11, 1985

Proclamation 5385 -- National Learning Disabilities Month, 1985

October 11, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The crowning wonder of our marvelous universe is the human brain. This organ of awesome complexity usually functions so dependably that thoughts can be transmitted from one person to another across the centuries, across the barriers of language, custom, and place. In all our daily transactions, we assume that others will comprehend and respond to the symbols of logic and language that are processed through the instrumentality of the brain.

Yet many Americans do not always find our language, numbers, and symbols natural and logical. They exhibit learning disabilities. In a sense, they are most aware of the deep complexity of our mental processes, for they must struggle to make the connections that, for most of us, are effortless habits.

While science still knows little about the biochemical and structural differences in brain function that may account for the various anomalies we call learning disabilities, our educators are finding alternative methods of teaching which help the learning disabled enjoy a greater use of their mental potential despite the difficulties they may face in reading, calculating, and other forms of mentation and expression. Meanwhile, scientific observation of the difficulties and the successes of learning-disabled persons is helping researchers gain greater understanding of both the learning process and the functioning of the brain.

Awareness of learning disabilities is one of the most important advances in education in recent years. As more and more Americans become aware, our citizens with learning disabilities will have even greater opportunity to lead full and productive lives and to make a contribution to our society.

The Congress, by House Joint Resolution 287, has designated the month of October 1985 as ``Learning Disabilities Awareness Month'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in honor of this observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the month of October 1985 as Learning Disabilities Awareness Month, and I call upon all Americans to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:15 p.m., October 11, 1985]

Proclamation 5386 -- National Down Syndrome Month, 1985

October 11, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Over the past decade, Americans have become increasingly aware of the accomplishments and the potential of the developmentally disabled. Nowhere has this become more evident than in the changed attitudes and perceptions regarding Down Syndrome.

Just a few short years ago, this condition carried with it the stigma of hopeless mental retardation. There were few options available other than institutionalization or other forms of custodial care. Today, great progress has been made on all fronts. Through advances in medical science, the basis for the condition has been uncovered, raising hopes for eventual prevention. Already, treatment can minimize the effects of the condition and increase the life span of people with Down Syndrome.

Through the efforts of concerned physicians, teachers, and parent groups, such as the National Down Syndrome Congress, programs are being put into place to assure access to appropriate medical treatment, education, rehabilitation, and employment. Such programs can have a dramatic impact on the lives of those with this disorder, respecting their intrinsic worth as individuals and maximizing the contributions they can make to society. These efforts include developing special education classes within the context of mainstream school programs; providing vocational training in preparation for competitive employment in the work force; and preparing young adults with Down Syndrome for independent living.

In addition, parents of babies with Down Syndrome are receiving the education and support they need to understand this condition and acquire new hope for the future of their children. We must work together to increase the awareness of the American public as a whole to the true nature of this condition and dispel the stubborn myths about the degree to which it is disabling.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 40, has designated the month of October 1985 as ``National Down Syndrome Month'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this month.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the month of October 1985 as National Down Syndrome Month. I invite all concerned citizens, agencies and organizations to unite during October with appropriate observances and activities directed toward resolution of the condition of Down Syndrome and toward assisting affected individuals and their families to enjoy to the fullest the blessings of life.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:18 p.m., October 11, 1985]

Proclamation 5387 -- Lupus Awareness Week, 1985

October 11, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Systemic lupus erythematosus (also known as lupus or SLE) is a potentially serious, complicated, inflammatory connective tissue disease that can produce changes in the structure and function of the skin, joints, and internal organs. More than 500,000 Americans are estimated to have lupus; approximately 90 percent of these are women. One of the most frequent serious disorders of young women, lupus is characterized by periods when the disease is active alternating with periods of remission.

In recent years, the outlook for lupus patients has become progessively brighter as a result of advances from biomedical research. Positive findings have emerged from such diverse projects as studies of the immune system; research on genetic and environmental factors; investigations of hormonal effects; and evaluations of the course and treatment of the disease and its complications. The Federal government and private voluntary organizations have developed a strong and enduring partnership committed to research on lupus. Working together, our objective must be to eradicate lupus and its tragic consequences.

In order for us to take advantage of the knowledge already gained, to increase public awareness of the characteristics and treatment of lupus, and to point up the urgent need for continuing research, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 57, has designated the week beginning October 20, 1985, through October 26, 1985, as ``Lupus Awareness Week'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this event.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim October 20 through October 26, 1985, as Lupus Awareness Week. I urge the people of the United States and educational, philanthropic, scientific, medical, and health care organizations and professionals to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and programs.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:19 p.m., October 11, 1985]

Proclamation 5388 -- Myasthenia Gravis Awareness Week, 1985

October 11, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Myasthenia gravis is a harrowing neuromuscular disorder that enfeebles as many as 250,000 of our citizens, most of them in their prime years. It debilitates strength and destroys vigor. Extreme muscle weakness and abnormal fatigue weigh down its victims, sapping their ability to stand, to walk, to pick up a glass and drink from it, and -- in critical cases -- even to breathe.

Myasthenia gravis can strike anyone at any time. While its exact cause is unknown, scientists have found evidence that a chemical needed to stimulate muscle movement is somehow blocked, leaving muscles unable to contract. Such new knowledge suggests the possibility of one day preventing myasthenia gravis by replenishing the missing chemical and restoring the transmission of nerve impulses. To this end, scientists supported by the Federal government's National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and by private voluntary groups -- notably the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation, Inc., and the Muscular Dystrophy Association -- are diligently investigating the basic neurological processes that underlie voluntary movement. Studies of immune system function are also underway to help scientists understand why myasthenia gravis patients seem more susceptible than others to infections.

Thanks to previous investigations, several drugs have been developed that can help many myasthenia gravis patients regain muscle strength and resume a fairly normal life. More research is needed, however, to find ways of liberating patients and their families from rigid medication schedules and from the side effects that accompany long-term drug use.

To acquaint the public with the tragedy of myasthenia gravis and the hope that research holds for eliminating this disorder, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 183, has designated the week of October 6, 1985, through October 12, 1985, as ``Myasthenia Gravis Awareness Week'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning October 6, 1985, as Myasthenia Gravis Awareness Week. I call upon all government agencies, health organizations, communications media, and people of the United States to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:39 a.m., October 15, 1985]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on October 12.

Proclamation 5389 -- National Housing Week, 1985

October 11, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

A gratifying sign of our continuing economic upswing is the greatly improved housing picture. The strength and ingenuity of private enterprise, the efficiency and liquidity of our capital markets, and sound government policies have brought decent and affordable housing to the overwhelming majority of Americans. The opportunity to own a home or to live in decent rental housing strengthens the family, the community, and the Nation. It gives individual Americans a stake in the local community and encourages responsible political involvement.

Since World War II, the housing industry has made an immense contribution to the economic prosperity of the United States. It has created millions of productive jobs, creating demand for goods and services, and generated billions of dollars in tax revenues.

Shelter is one of the most basic human needs, and therefore encouraging the production of decent affordable housing must be a primary concern at all levels of government. It is, then, fitting to reaffirm our national commitment to livable housing and family home ownership and to recognize the multiple economic benefits engendered by the current housing recovery.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 197, has designated the week beginning October 6, 1985, through October 13, 1985, as ``National Housing Week'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this event.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning October 6, 1985, as National Housing Week. I call upon the Governors, Mayors of our cities, and people of this Nation to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:40 a.m., October 15, 1985]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on October 12.