Proclamation 5396 -- A Time of Remembrance, 1985

October 23, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The problem of terrorism has become an international concern that knows no boundaries -- religious, racial, political, or national. Thousands of men, women, and children have died at the hands of terrorists in nations around the world, and the lives of many more have been blighted by the fear and grief that terrorist attacks have caused to peace-loving peoples. Today, unfortunately, terrorism continues to claim many innocent lives.

Recent events in the Middle East, including the piratic seizure of the ACHILLE LAURO and the brutal murder of Leon Klinghoffer, only serve to remind us of the intolerable threat from terrorists. All Americans share the sorrow of the families of their victims, and we are determined that those responsible be brought to justice.

October 23 is the second anniversary of the date on which the largest number of Americans was killed in a single act of terrorism -- the bombing of the United States compound in Beirut, Lebanon on October 23, 1983, in which 241 United States servicemen lost their lives. These brave soldiers died defending our cherished ideals of freedom and peace. It is appropriate that we honor these men and all other victims of terrorism. Let us also offer our profound condolences to the families and friends of the victims of these unprovoked and contemptible acts of violence.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 104, has designated October 23, 1985, as ``A Time of Remembrance'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this event.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim October 23, 1985, as A Time of Remembrance. I urge all Americans to take time to reflect on the sacrifices that have been made in the pursuit of peace and freedom.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-third day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:38 a.m., October 23, 1985]