Proclamations, April 4, 1985

Proclamation 5314 -- National Weather Satellite Week, 1985

April 4, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The United States' weather satellites have tracked the Earth's weather since April 1, 1960, and have brought unique benefits to the American people and to the world.

Weather satellites have proven exceptionally valuable in detecting, monitoring, and giving early warning of hurricanes, severe storms, flash floods, and other life-threatening natural hazards, on a local, national, and international basis.

The international weather satellite search-and-rescue program has saved over three hundred lives since 1982. The achievements of the scientific and aerospace communities in developing weather satellites have contributed significantly to the United States' leadership in satellite technology, international cooperation in space, and an integrated global weather forecasting system.

Weather satellites have evolved into environmental satellites that also monitor snow and ice cover, forest damage, vegetation, forest fires, volcanic eruptions, sea surface temperatures, and ocean currents.

Environmental satellite data are used for research and for commercial purposes in meteorology, hydrology, agriculture, oceanography, forestry, and fisheries. The United States' prestige is enhanced by the direct dissemination of environmental satellite data to more than one hundred and twenty countries.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has been the world leader in the development of experimental and prototypical weather and environmental satellites. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the Department of Commerce has demonstrated outstanding leadership in the management of operational weather and environmental satellite systems and programs.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 62, has designated the week of March 31, 1985 through April 6, 1985, as ``National Weather Satellite Week,'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this event.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning March 31, 1985 through April 6, 1985, as National Weather Satellite Week. In recognition of the twenty-fifth anniversary of weather satellites, I call upon the people of the United States to observe such week with appropriate ceremonies.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 4th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:45 a.m., April 5, 1985]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on April 5.

Proclamation 5315 -- National Child Abuse Prevention Month, 1985

April 4, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

There is no more important test of a society than how it treats its children. Children are not only a joy to the parents who raise them; they also represent a society's future. It is imperative for American society to protect its children and nurture them.

More and more Americans are turning once again to strong and loving families as the best way to provide a nurturing environment for children. This is as it should be, but there are still many indications that we must do more to protect our children and show that we love each and every one of them. One of the most disturbing of these indications is the fact that more than 1.5 million children will be reported to local child protective agencies this year as suspected victims of child abuse or neglect. As a direct result of their maltreatment, many of these children will suffer diminished opportunity to develop physically, intellectually, emotionally, and socially, or to become fully contributing citizens.

Their loss is our Nation's loss. In the past decade, our knowledge of how to prevent and treat child abuse has grown substantially. The most important thing we have learned is that the active involvement of neighbors and friends -- indeed of everyone in a community -- is the key to success. Community child protection agencies cannot do the job alone but must rely on neighbors, friends, teachers, relatives, doctors, and volunteers to provide critical support, information, and guidance to families in which child maltreatment may occur.

Beyond these efforts, we should all consider every day the kind of society we want to create. Problems such as child pornography, violence on television, teenage suicide, missing children, and child abuse are all related to the strength or weakness of our society's values. We should resolve to strengthen the fundamental values of family and community on which our Nation was founded and which can alone provide it with a good future for all our children.

In recognition of our shared responsibility to reduce the occurrence of child abuse and neglect, the Congress, by House Joint Resolution 121, has designated the month of April 1985 as ``National Child Abuse Prevention Month,'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this period.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the month of April 1985 as National Child Abuse Prevention Month. As we observe this time, let us all consider the wholesome and secure development of our children on whom we depend to advance our national character and values.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:46 a.m., April 5, 1985]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on April 5.

Proclamation 5316 -- World Health Week and World Health Day, 1985

April 4, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

World Health Day, which marks the founding of the World Health Organization, serves to remind us that good health is a priceless commodity, which all the world's people should have the opportunity to enjoy throughout their life span.

The theme for World Health Day, 1985, ``Healthy Youth: Our Best Resource,'' is particularly appropriate this year, which has been selected by the United Nations as International Youth Year. Today's youth represent a tremendous potential for society. In all countries, rich and poor, this group is the healthiest age group of all and is far better educated than preceding generations. They have survived the infectious diseases of childhood, such as measles, whooping cough, and polio. But they are also the most vulnerable to lifestyle practices that threaten later adulthood -- poor food habits, cigarette smoking, abuse of alcohol and drugs, and inadequate exercise. It is our responsibility as parents and teachers to educate our youth on the importance of avoiding harmful drugs, practicing good safety measures, maintaining a proper diet, and getting regular exercise.

Furthermore, on World Health Day, the United States is pleased to join its fellow members of the World Health Organization in promoting healthy growth, and in pledging our continued support for efforts to improve the health of people throughout the world.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 50, has designated the week of April 1 through April 7, 1985 as ``World Health Week'' and designated April 7, 1985 as ``World Health Day,'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of these events.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning April 1 through April 7, 1985, as World Health Week, and April 7, 1985 as World Health Day. I call upon all of the people of the United States to observe this week with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities and by practicing the lifestyles that promote good health.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:47 a.m., April 5, 1985]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on April 5.

Proclamation 5317 -- Education Day, U.S.A., 1985

April 4, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

In order to achieve its highest goals, education must be more than just a training in facts and figures, or even in basic skills, as important as they are. It must also include instruction in the deepest ethical values of our civilization.

Very few Americans have done more to promote these ethical values as the basis of civilization than Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, the leader of the worldwide Lubavitch movement. The word ``Lubavitch'' comes from the name of a Russian city and means city of love. That is very appropriate because, of all the ethical values which inform our civilization, none is more important than love -- love of wisdom, love of our fellowman, and love of our Creator.

These are the values which Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson exemplifies. And they are the values, with their roots in the Seven Noahide Laws, which have guided the Lubavitch movement throughout its history. They are the essence of education at its best, and we should be certain that we pass on this precious heritage to all young Americans.

In recognition of Rabbi Schneerson's contributions and in honor of his 83rd birthday, which falls this year on April 2, the Congress, by House Joint Resolution 186, has designated April 2, 1985, as ``Education Day, U.S.A.'' and authorized and requested the President to issue an appropriate proclamation in observance of this event.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Tuesday, April 2, 1985, as Education Day, U.S.A., and I call upon the people of the United States, and in particular our teachers and other educational leaders, to observe that day with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:48 a.m., April 5, 1985]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on April 5.