Proclamations, April 15, 1985

Proclamation 5318 -- Pan American Day and Pan American Week, 1985

April 15, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The countries of the Western Hemisphere are bound together by their humanitarian ideals, their respect for individual liberty, and their yearning for peace and prosperity -- goals eloquently expressed in the Charter of the Organization of American States. Just as our Revolution of 1776 was an inspiration for Simon Bolivar and Jose de San Martin, so we in the United States took inspiration from the struggle of our neighbors to be free from foreign domination. We continue to take courage from those great struggles for liberty today, when new forms of tyranny and modern totalitarian systems threaten the peace and security of the Hemisphere, especially in Central America.

The Organization of American States, embodying the Inter-American System, links together this diverse group of nations, with their Spanish, Portuguese, French, English, African, and Indian heritages. But whatever their creeds, languages, or cultures, the peoples of our Hemisphere are united in the common cause of ending poverty, disease, and illiteracy. The O.A.S. has played a notable role in this cause.

More and more countries of the Hemisphere are turning to democratic institutions to solve political, social, educational, and economic problems. They realize that peace, prosperity, and freedom are best served when the people, faced with a real choice of political parties, freely elect their own governments.

On this Pan American Day of 1985, the people of the United States extend warm greetings to all their neighbors in the Americas and reaffirm their active support for the Organization of American States and the principles for which it stands.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Sunday, April 14, 1985, as Pan American Day, and the week beginning April 14, 1985, through April 20, 1985, as Pan American Week. I urge the Governors of every State of the Union, and the Governor of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and officials of the other areas under the flag of the United States of America to honor these observances with appropriate activities and ceremonies.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:15 a.m., April 16, 1985]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on April 16.

Proclamation 5319 -- Loyalty Day, 1985

April 15, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Providence has favored our land, with its abundant resources and industrious people, and the years of adversity in our history have been few. Yet even during the dark hours, the times of conflict or economic hardship, Americans have demonstrated their unwavering devotion to the noble ideals upon which this country was founded. Our faith in the principles of freedom, justice, and opportunity has sustained us. We have prevailed over every challenge and our success shines as a beacon of hope for the world, an enduring reminder that adherence to the fundamental values of liberty will overcome any obstacle.

Today these values are enjoying renewed allegiance in America and elsewhere; the advantages of our democratic way of life are winning the United States new admiration and respect around the world.

Americans' loyalty to their Nation is especially inspiring because it is freely given by a free people. Nations that seek to compel the love or fidelity of their citizens without tolerance for their unalienable rights are inherently unstable and frequently dangerous to others. Now that the windows of communication and commerce are bringing nations into increasingly close relationships, the truths our forefathers found self-evident are becoming apparent to all: the future belongs to the free -- to peoples who are free to work, to assemble, to vote, to travel and to emigrate, to print and to speak, and to worship as they choose.

Today, in this time of peace and prosperity at home, it is fitting that we reflect upon the venerable ideals that symbolize the American spirit. By remaining loyal to these ideals, we will be worthy of the trust a generous God has reposed in us. For this purpose, the Congress, by joint resolution approved July 18, 1958 (72 Stat. 369, 36 U.S.C. 162), has designated May 1 of each year as Loyalty Day, a day to renew our commitment to this grand republic and its democratic institutions.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 1, 1985, as Loyalty Day and call upon all Americans and patriotic, civic, and educational organizations to observe that day with appropriate ceremonies. I also call upon all government officials to display the flag of the United States on all government buildings and grounds on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:01 p.m., April 16, 1985]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on April 16.

Proclamation 5320 -- Law Day, U.S.A., 1985

April 15, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

May 1, 1985, is Law Day, U.S.A. This year's Law Day theme, ``Liberty and Justice for All,'' reaffirms the principles upon which our Republic was founded. The guarantee of liberty and the right to seek justice emerged through law: through the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. As Americans, we continue to preserve these principles through our lawmaking and judicial systems.

Each time we recite the Pledge of Allegiance, we renew our commitment to providing the benefits of liberty and the reality of justice for all.

These principles have served and continue to serve as an inspiration to everyone in this great Nation, because they represent a promise, an ideal, and an opportunity. It is the promise of liberty and justice for all that has brought millions of immigrants to American shores. It is the ideal of liberty and justice for all that has guided our government in making and enforcing our laws. It is the opportunity for liberty and justice for all that has inspired Americans from all walks of life to participate in and give life to our unique form of government.

The fact that we continue to strive to be one Nation, under God, with liberty and justice for all, is a tribute to the memory of the millions of Americans who, throughout our history, have been willing to die to secure or preserve these ideals. The great partriot Patrick Henry's impassioned plea, ``Give me liberty or give me death,'' continues to symbolize today the fervor with which Americans treasure these freedoms.

Law Day is an important opportunity for all Americans to improve their understanding and appreciation of the contribution law makes to the preservation of liberty and justice. I urge all Americans to join with me in renewing our dedication to those principles for which so many Americans have sacrificed their lives.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Wednesday, May 1, 1985, as Law Day, U.S.A. I urge the people of the United States to use this occasion to renew their commitment to the rule of law and to reaffirm our dedication to the partnership of law and liberty. I also urge the legal profession, schools, civic, service, and fraternal organizations, public bodies, libraries, the courts, the communications media, business, the clergy, and all interested individuals and organizations to join in efforts to focus attention on the need for the rule of law. I also call upon all public officials to display the flag of the United States on all government buildings open on Law Day, May 1, 1985.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 15th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:02 p.m., April 16, 1985]

Note: The President signed the proclamation at a ceremony in the Oval Office at the White House at 4:45 p.m. The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on April 16.