Proclamations, April 22,1985

Proclamation 5323 -- World Trade Week, 1985

April 22, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Each year, through World Trade Week, we celebrate the many ways in which international trade strengthens our country and enriches our lives.

Increased trade strengthens our own economy, as well as helping to sustain and spread world economic growth. American exports help create new growth opportunities for our businesses and new opportunities for employment for our workers. To the American consumer, freer and fairer trade has meant better products in greater variety and at lower prices.

Through contact with other societies, we receive new ideas and gain a better understanding of our traditional values. We reinforce our ties of amity and peace with other countries through strong bonds of commercial interest and mutual respect.

We Americans are used to a role of responsible leadership in world affairs. It is a role we value, and it has won us the respect of other nations. We know that more jobs, greater prosperity, and dynamic economies are based on freer and fairer trade. Other countries take courage from our confidence and competitive spirit.

Despite stronger competition for world markets, record trade deficits, and a growing threat of protectionism abroad, the United States has resisted the temptation to adopt self-defeating protectionist measures of its own. We have called upon other countries to open their markets to fair competition. We are working with our trading partners to launch a new round of multilateral trade negotiations by early next year aimed at opening markets worldwide.

Americans can be proud that economic growth in the United States has helped fuel the recovery of our trading partners who can now affort to buy more of our goods and services. Americans can be proud of the U.S. commitment to policies promoting unrestricted trade and investment consistent with our security interests.

Now, Therefore, I Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning May 19, 1985, as World Trade Week, and I request all Federal, State, and local officials to cooperate in its observance.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:46 p.m., April 22, 1985]

Proclamation 5324 -- National Organ Donation Awareness Week, 1985

April 22, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The most precious gift that one human being can bestow upon another is the gift of life. It can be given simply by making arrangements to donate our organs or those of our loved ones after death. Donation of our corneas would give others the gift of sight; donation of our kidneys, hearts, lungs, livers, and pancreata could save the lives of many people who might otherwise die.

On several recent occasions, I have asked the American people to be aware of the opportunities to donate their organs, and I have made special pleas for young children in need of liver transplants. The response proved to be overwhelming. Tragically, however, many desperately ill persons, including young children, have died while awaiting a suitable organ.

The need for organs far surpasses the number donated each year. To increase the availability of organs for transplantation, I signed the National Organ Transplant Act on October 19, 1984. This law created an Office of Organ Transplantation in the Public Health Service and authorized a Task Force on Organ Transplantation.

It is appropriate that we as a Nation encourage organ donation and increase public awareness of the need for such donations. We also should recognize the many contributions of private organizations, including the American Council on Transplantation, to this effort. By filling out a uniform donor card and carrying it, and by making our wishes of donation known to our families, we may give the gift of life to people who so desperately need organs for transplantation.

Americans are a caring and giving people. I have heard from many Americans who have lost their loved ones in tragic accidents, but who have found solace in knowing that through their loss other lives were saved.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 35, has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation designating the week beginning April 21 through April 27, 1985, as ``National Organ Donation Awareness Week.''

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate April 21 through April 27, 1985, as National Organ Donation Awareness Week. I urge all health care professionals, educators, the media, public and private organizations concerned with organ donation and transplantation, and all Americans to join me in supporting this humanitarian action.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:12 p.m., April 23, 1985]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on April 23.

Proclamation 5325 -- Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week, 1985

April 22, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The Pacific Ocean today is ringed by a large number of successful developed and developing nations. So rapid has the progress of this area been that many scholars are beginning to speak of an emerging Pacific Civilization similar to the Mediterranean Civilization of the ancient world or the Atlantic Civilization of modern times. America is well-placed to play a major role in this emerging civilization not only because of its geographic position but also because many of its citizens are themselves of Asian and Pacific ancestry.

Americans of Asian and Pacific ancestry are a diverse group, representing as many different ethnic allegiances as Americans of European ancestry, but certain common values characterize them all. Whether as immigrants to our country or as native inhabitants in the islands of the Pacific Ocean, they have retained a strong sense of traditional values emphasizing vital family and communal bonds. These values remain strong today and play an important role in the success achieved by these proud Americans.

Asian and Pacific Americans have been successful in virtually every field of endeavor. Through their achievements in many areas, they have enriched the lives of all Americans. By sharing their cultures with other Americans, they have increased our Nation's rich cultural vitality. Asian and Pacific Americans have truly helped the United States to fulfill its most cherished ideals.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning May 5, 1985, as Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week and call upon all Americans to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:18 p.m., April 23, 1985]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on April 23.