Proclamations, May 21, 1985

Proclamation 5343 -- National Maritime Day, 1985

May 21, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The restructuring of the Nation's maritime policy and regulations to create an environment in which our shipping industry can prosper is of great importance to the United States.

Since its birth as a Nation, the United States has relied on the oceans for commerce and as avenues for the protection of national interests. The United States is truly a maritime power by necessity.

Maritime power has two principal components. One component, the Navy and the Coast Guard, guards America's free use of the seas while the other component, the Merchant Marine, supports trade with nations and, in an emergency, becomes a part of our military establishment -- integral with our military forces.

This role of our civilian mariners is not new. In World War II, virtually every serviceman who saw action against the enemy was transported overseas by ship. In Vietnam, more than 90 percent of the war material utilized in that conflict went by sea.

Our brave merchant seamen took their place alongside the fighting men of our armed services in combat against a determined enemy. In World War II, from December 1941 to August 1945, the United States lost 5,638 merchant seamen aboard 733 ships sunk by submarines. Through the first part of 1943, the casualty rate among U.S. merchant seamen was greater than in all the armed services.

To maintain America's maritime power this Administration has advocated that a number of steps be taken by government, industry, and labor:

-- Maintenance of a superior Navy, Marine Corps, and a highly capable Coast Guard. A superior Navy is required to protect merchant ships in time of emergency, in recognition of the critical nature of their military and economic cargoes.

-- An economically independent United States flag merchant marine of not less than its current capabilities.

-- An adequate shipyard mobilization base. The construction of the 600-ship Navy is helping to maintain the shipyard mobilization base.

-- Continued emphasis on merchant vessel security agreements between the United States and its allies, such as the NATO ship-sharing agreement.

The enactment of the Shipping Act of 1984 was a major step toward regaining a prominent position on the world's trade routes for our country. It diminished or streamlined outdated regulations that governed the ocean liner industry, and it has helped rekindle the spirit of American maritime enterprise. American-flag liner companies are now in the forefront of developments that are providing shippers with more efficient, extensive, and innovative intermodal services.

Our Merchant Marine is being bolstered by the replacement of obsolete ships with new, efficient, and highly competitive vessels. With the cooperation of seafaring labor, these new fleet additions are being operated with small crews that increase their productivity and competitiveness.

These healthy trends should be encouraged. We must work to continue to develop the strong American merchant marine to serve our Nation's peacetime trade and support our Armed Forces.

In recognition of the importance of the American merchant marine, the Congress, by joint resolution approved May 20, 1933, designated May 22 of each year as ``National Maritime Day'' and authorized and requested the President to issue annually a proclamation calling for its appropriate observance. This date was chosen to commemorate the day in 1819 when the SS SAVANNAH departed Savannah, Georgia, on the first transatlantic steamship voyage.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 22, 1985, as National Maritime Day, and I urge the people of the United States to observe this day by displaying the flag of the United States at their homes and other suitable places, and I request that all ships sailing under the American flag dress ship on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-first day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 2:18 p.m., May 21, 1985]

Proclamation 5344 -- National Osteoporosis Awareness Week, 1985

May 21, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Osteoporosis is a condition in which bone mass decreases, causing bones to be more susceptible to fracture. It may develop without warning. A fall, blow, or lifting action that would not strain the average person can easily cause one or more bones to break in a person with severe osteoporosis.

Some 15 to 20 million Americans are afflicted with osteoporosis. The risk of developing the disease increases with age and is higher in women than in men. It is estimated that 25 percent of postmenopausal women in the United States will develop osteoporosis. Among people who live to be age 90, 32 percent of women and 17 percent of men will suffer a hip fracture, mostly due to osteoporosis. More than 50,000 older women and many older men die each year in the United States as a result of such complications. It is estimated that national health costs related to osteoporosis are at least $3.8 billion annually.

As scientific knowledge about the disease continues to grow, there is reason for hope. New research findings and new approaches to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment are being developed. The Federal government and private voluntary organizations have created a strong and enduring partnership committed to research on osteoporosis. Working together, our objective must be to uncover the cause and cure for this major public health problem.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 61, has designated the week beginning May 20, 1985, through May 26, 1985, as ``National Osteoporosis Awareness Week'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this event.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 20, 1985, through May 26, 1985, as National Osteoporosis Awareness Week. I urge the people of the United States and educational, philanthropic, scientific, medical, and health care organizations and professionals to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-first day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:49 a.m., May 22, 1985]

Proclamation 5345 -- National Medical Transcriptionist Week, 1985

May 21, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Record-keeping is a vital function in our society, and one of the most important records for every American is the medical record. That record, including reports prepared and edited by a medical transcriptionist from physician dictation, is the permanent history of a patient's medical care.

A century ago, physicians knew many of their patients from birth, knew all their ailments, and provided all their medical care. Today, with medical specialization and greater mobility among people, many skilled physicians may treat the average American during a lifetime. Using transcribed medical reports, each physician can easily and quickly review a patient's medical history even if the physician has never seen that patient before. Because of the work done by trained medical transcriptionists, patients can be assured that the history of their medical care is portrayed accurately and legibly. Medical transcriptionists have therefore become a vital link between the physician and the patient.

It is appropriate for our Nation to recognize the contributions of medical transcriptionists. We should encourage hospitals, allied health education programs, and community colleges to provide appropriate courses of instruction recognizing the high standards that must be met by medical transcriptionists and the vital function they perform.

In recognition of the need for medical transcriptionists in today's society, the Congress, by Public Law 98 - 609, has designated the week beginning May 20, 1985, as ``National Medical Transcriptionist Week'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this event.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate the week of May 20 through May 26, 1985, as National Medical Transcriptionist Week, and I urge all Americans to participate in appropriate ceremonies in observance of this event.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-first day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:50 a.m., May 22, 1985]