Proclamations, August 13, 1985

Proclamation 5361 -- Polish American Heritage Month, 1985

August 13, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The history of Polish Americans is an inspiring part of our Nation's heritage. The first massive wave of Polish immigrants came to America to flee the political and economic oppression thrust upon their homeland by the 19th century imperial powers of Eastern and Central Europe. While they came with few material possessions, they brought something much more important -- a deep faith in God and a determination to succeed in this land of opportunity. And succeed they did. They established churches, schools, and fraternal benefit societies. They worked hard in the mines, steel mills, and stockyards. They understood the importance of education, so that today, the children and grandchildren of the first immigrants can be found in America's leading businesses and educational institutions.

Americans of Polish descent have made, and continue to make, enormous contributions to the culture, economy, and democratic political system of the United States. The names of Tadeusz Kosciuszko and Kazimierz Pulaski, heroes of the American Revolution, have left a lasting imprint upon our history. Highways, bridges, and towns dedicated to the preservation of their memory dot our countryside. In the future, other public facilities and institutions will be named for today's prominent Polish Americans, such as those serving our Nation in the Executive branch, in Congress, the armed services, and in state capitols and city halls from coast to coast.

The dedication of Polish Americans from all walks of life to the ideals of freedom and independence, which Kosciuszko and Pulaski fought for in America and in Poland, and which their worthy successors within the Solidarity movement are struggling for in Poland today, serves as a model for all Americans. That struggle remains alive today and two Polish leaders of international stature -- Pope John Paul II and Lech Walesa -- provide inspiring examples of moral leadership for us all.

The Congress, by House Joint Resolution 106, has designated August 1985 as ``Polish American Heritage Month'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this month.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim August 1985 as Polish American Heritage Month. I urge all Americans to join their fellow citizens of Polish descent in observance of this month.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirteenth day of August, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:13 a.m., August 15, 1985]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on August 14.

Proclamation 5362 -- National Neighborhood Crime Watch Day, 1985

August 13, 1985

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

A Nation promising justice for all must ensure that its citizens are free from fear of crime in their homes and on the streets. Yet crime continues to be a substantial problem for American society. Twenty-three million households were touched by crime in 1984 and felt, in varying degrees, the pain, economic loss, sense of violation, and frustration that accompany crime victimization.

Fewer households were victims of crime in 1984 than in any of the previous nine years, due in part to greater public awareness and understanding of crime. This Administration is committed to increasing that awareness and understanding, thereby assisting in our Nation's effort to combat crime.

We recognize the effectiveness and the growth of local crime watch organizations throughout the country and the major role they have played in turning the tide against crime. By working together and in cooperation with their local law enforcement agencies, citizens have always been one of our most effective deterrents against crime. Such citizen action reaffirms those values of community, respect for the law, and individual responsibility that are so much a part of our national heritage.

It is important that all of the citizens of this Nation are aware of the significance of community crime prevention programs and the valuable impact that their participation can have on reducing crime in their neighborhoods. A ``National Night Out'' campaign will be conducted on August 13, 1985 to call attention to the importance of community crime prevention programs. All Americans will be urged to spend the hour between 8 - 9 p.m. on that evening on their lawns, porches, and steps in front of their homes to signify that neighbors looking out for one another is the most effective form of crime prevention.

Participation in this nationwide event also will demonstrate the value and effectiveness of police and community working together in a partnership on crime prevention. It will generate support for, and participation in, local crime watch programs; strengthen neighborhood spirit in the anticrime effort; and send a message to criminals that neighborhoods across America are organized and watching. This is a unique effort to remind the American people of the crucial role they can play in making their streets and neighborhoods safer. Strong, safe communities don't just happen. They are built by people who care and volunteer their time and energy to make the community a good place to live.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 168, has designated August 13, 1985, as ``National Neighborhood Crime Watch Day'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this event.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim August 13, 1985, as National Neighborhood Crime Watch Day. I call upon the people of the United States to spend the period from 8 to 9 o'clock p.m. that day with their neighbors in front of their homes to demonstrate the importance and effectiveness of community participation in crime prevention efforts.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirteenth day of August, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:14 a.m., August 15, 1985]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on August 14.