Proclamations, February 11, 1986

Proclamation 5440 -- National Burn Awareness Week, 1986

February 11, 1986

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Burn injuries are one of the leading causes of accidental death in the United States. Every year, approximately two million people in this country are victims of burn injury and about twelve thousand of these victims die.

The rehabilitative and psychological impact of burns is devastating. Children, the elderly, and the disabled are most likely to suffer serious burns.

It is estimated that approximately 75 percent of all burns could be prevented by proper education of children and adults. Therefore, it is appropriate that all Americans have called to their attention the risks from burn accidents and the importance of burn prevention programs.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 234, has designated the week beginning February 9, 1986, as ``National Burn Awareness Week'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this event.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of February 9, 1986, through February 15, 1986, as National Burn Awareness Week, and I call upon the people of the United States and all Federal, State, and local government officials to observe this week with appropriate programs and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of February, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:32 a.m., February 12, 1986]

Proclamation 5441 -- National Humanities Week, 1986

February 11, 1986

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

In 1986, the United States celebrates the twentieth anniversary of the establishment of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The overriding goal of this small but important Federal agency is the promotion of humanities scholarship and programming.

The study of the humanities increases our understanding of the great traditions of civilization and of the intellectual heritage of mankind. In partnerships with State and local governments, private foundations, and corporations, the National Endowment for the Humanities, over the past two decades, has provided critical leadership and direction for both individuals and institutions seeking to improve our understanding of the humanities.

As a Nation, we have benefitted from the fruits of this humanities programming in a variety of ways: through improvements in humanities education at all levels; through scholarly research at the cutting edge of contemporary issues in the humanities; and through programs and projects in museums, libraries, and the media that foster a heightened understanding of the humanities across America.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 219, has designated the week beginning February 9, 1986, as ``National Humanities Week, 1986'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this event.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning February 9, 1986, as National Humanities Week, 1986. I call upon the people of the United States to observe the week with appropriate conferences, programs, ceremonies, and activities recognizing the importance of the humanities in the lives of all Americans and acknowledging the significant role the National Endowment for the Humanities has played in sustaining and enriching our cultural heritage.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of February, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:33 a.m., February 12, 1986]