Message to the Congress Reporting on the National Emergency With Respect to South Africa

March 17, 1986

To the Congress of the United States:

On September 9, 1985, in Executive Order 12532 (50 Fed. Reg. 36861, Sept. 10, 1985), I declared a national emergency to deal with the threat posed by the policies and actions of the Government of South Africa to the foreign policy and economy of the United States.

Pursuant to that Order, I prohibited certain transactions, including the following: (1) the making or approval of bank loans to the South African Government, with certain narrow exceptions; (2) the export of computers and related goods and technology to certain government agencies and any apartheid enforcing entity of the South African Government; (3) nuclear exports to South Africa and related transactions, with certain narrow exceptions; (4) the import into the United States of arms, ammunition, or military vehicles produced in South Africa; and (5) the extension of export marketing support to U.S. firms employing at least twenty-five persons in South Africa which do not adhere to certain fair labor standards.

In addition, I directed (6) the Secretary of State and the United States Trade Representative to consult with other parties to the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade with a view toward adopting a prohibition on the import of Krugerrands; (7) the Secretary of the Treasury to complete a study within 60 days regarding the feasibility of minting U.S. gold coins; (8) the Secretary of State to take the steps necessary to increase the amounts provided for scholarships in South Africa for those disadvantaged by the system of apartheid and to increase the amounts allocated for South Africa in the Human Rights Fund; and (9) the Secretary of State to establish an Advisory Committee to provide recommendations on measures to encourage peaceful change in South Africa.

The declaration of emergency was made pursuant to the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and laws of the United States, including the International Emergency Economic Powers Act, 50 U.S.C. 1701 et seq., and the National Emergencies Act, 50 U.S.C. 1601 et seq. I submitted a report regarding the declaration to the Congress on September 9, 1985, pursuant to Section 204(b) of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act. Pursuant to Section 204(c) of that act, I am today reporting on the major actions taken in the exercise of the authorities contained in that act and Executive Order 12532. The following actions are listed in chronological order, and a copy of all implementing rules and regulations is enclosed.

On October 1, 1985, in Executive Order 12535, I prohibited the importation of the South African Krugerrands into the United States effective October 11, 1985 (50 Fed. Reg. 40325, Oct. 3, 1985). This Order implemented the course of action contemplated in Section 5(a) of Executive Order 12532.

On October 7, 1985, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms of the Department of the Treasury issued regulations on the Importation of Articles on the United States Munitions Import List (50 Fed. Reg. 42157, Oct. 18, 1985). These regulations implemented the prohibition of certain arms imports contained in Section 1(d) of Executive Order 12532.

On October 9, 1985, the Office of Foreign Assets Control of the Department of the Treasury issued the South African Transactions Regulations (50 Fed. Reg. 41682, Oct. 15, 1985). These regulations implemented the ban on the importation of the Krugerrand.

On October 22, 1985, the Department of State published a notice in the Federal Register regarding the Establishment of the Advisory Committee on South Africa (50 Fed. Reg. 42817, Oct. 22, 1985). The Charter of the Advisory Committee has been filed with the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, the House Foreign Affairs Committee, and the Library of Congress. The Committee shall render a report to the Secretary of State within one year of its first meeting, which was held on January 29 - 30.

On November 4, 1985, the Department of State issued proposed regulations for public comment on South Africa and Fair Labor Standards (50 Fed. Reg. 46455, Nov. 8, 1985). The draft regulations were designed to implement the fair labor provisions stated in Section 2 of Executive Order 12532. Final regulations were issued by the Department of State on December 23, 1985 (50 Fed. Reg. 53308, Dec. 31, 1985).

On November 6, 1985, the Office of Foreign Assets Control of the Department of the Treasury issued the South African Transactions Regulations (50 Fed. Reg. 46726, Nov. 12, 1985). These regulations implemented the bank loan prohibition of Section 1(a) of Executive Order 12532.

On November 8, 1985, the Secretary of the Treasury submitted a report on the feasibility of minting U.S. gold coins. On December 17, 1985, I signed the Gold Bullion Coin Act of 1985 (Public Law 99 - 185), which requires the minting of such coins.

On November 14, 1985, the International Trade Administration of the Department of Commerce issued regulations on Export Controls on the Republic of South Africa (50 Fed. Reg. 47363, Nov. 18, 1985). These regulations implemented the computer export prohibition in Section 1(b) and the prohibition against licensing exports to nuclear production and utilization facilities in Section 1(c) of Executive Order 12532.

The policies and actions of the Government of South Africa continue to pose an unusual and extraordinary threat to the foreign policy and economy of the United States. I shall continue to exercise the powers at my disposal to apply the measures contained in Executive Order 12532 as long as these measures are appropriate, and will continue to report periodically to the Congress on significant developments pursuant to 50 U.S.C. 1703(c).

Ronald Reagan

The White House,

March 17, 1986.