Proclamations, April 7, 1986

Proclamation 5454 -- World Health Week and World Health Day, 1986

April 7, 1986

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

World Health Day, which marks the founding of the World Health Organization, serves to remind us that good health is a priceless treasure and that recent advances in the sciences of medicine, nutrition, hygiene, public health, and immunology make the possession of that treasure possible for more people than ever before.

The theme for World Health Day 1986, ``Healthy Living: Everyone a Winner,'' emphasizes the positive steps that individuals and communities can take to protect and promote health. In furtherance of the global goal of Health for All by the Year 2000, the World Health Organization and its member governments are stressing the benefits that come from healthful patterns of living, with particular attention to exercise, nutrition, and the avoidance of such destructive habits as smoking and the abuse of alcohol and drugs.

In recent years, health leaders and private physicians in the United States have emphasized how much each person can do to maintain good health by a regimen of good diet, proper exercise, and the avoidance of substance abuse. This campaign is beginning to bear fruit, and the United States is experiencing encouraging reductions in the incidence of heart disease and stroke.

It is appropriate that as all member governments commemorate World Health Day, we should join other members of the World Health Organization in promoting healthful living and physical fitness and in pledging our continued support to improving the health of all the people who inhabit this planet.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 226, has designated the week of April 6 through April 12, 1986, as ``World Health Week,'' and April 7, 1986, as ``World Health Day,'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of these events.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of April 6 through April 12, 1986, as World Health Week, and April 7, 1986, as World Health Day. I call upon the people of the United States to observe this week with appropriate programs and activities and by resolving to attend to personal health through good nutrition, appropriate physical exercise, and the avoidance of such unhealthful practices as smoking and abuse of alcohol and drugs.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:58 a.m., April 8, 1986]

Proclamation 5455 -- Cancer Control Month, 1986

April 7, 1986

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

This Nation's investment in basic cancer research has led us to an unprecedented understanding of the cancer cell. With this new knowledge, we are undertaking major efforts to prevent cancer; to reverse the process once it starts; to find ways to activate the body's own immune system; and to treat the disease and its symptoms more effectively.

Our scientists are giving us an abundance of new information about behavior and precautions we can take to help protect us against cancer.

Much evidence suggests that diets high in fiber and low in fat may reduce cancer risk. We can adopt a daily diet high in fiber by choosing plenty of fresh fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain breads and cereals. We can reduce animal fat intake by choosing low-fat and lean foods, and by using low-fat cooking methods.

Smoking-related cancers are the most preventable. This past year, new data showed that the incidence of lung cancer in white men decreased significantly for the first time in at least half a century. This decrease comes 20 years after men began to stop smoking in substantial numbers. This proves that individuals can successfully reduce their cancer risk by not smoking.

This message is especially important for women, whose rates of lung cancer show no signs of leveling off or decreasing. In fact, lung cancer is expected to surpass breast cancer this year as the leading cause of cancer deaths among women. Rates of lung cancer are also high for black men.

The growing popularity of smokeless tobacco products among our youth, particularly teenage boys, is of great concern. Early this year, medical experts concluded that there is strong evidence that such forms of tobacco cause cancer of the mouth.

Some promising findings this year give new hope to cancer patients. Scientists reported a totally new approach to cancer treatment, an approach that activates the immune system to destroy cancer cells in some patients. Extensive studies are underway to refine and perfect the treatment so that it can become widely available as soon as possible.

We have set as a national goal reduction of the national cancer death rate by one-half of its 1980 level by the year 2000. This can be achieved through the active involvement of all Americans.

In 1938, the Congress of the United States passed a joint resolution (52 Stat. 148; 36 U.S.C. 150) requesting the President to issue an annual proclamation declaring April to be Cancer Control Month.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the month of April 1986 as Cancer Control Month. I invite the Governors of the fifty States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the appropriate officials of all other areas under the United States flag, to issue similar proclamations. I also ask the health care professionals, communications industry, food industry, community groups, women's organizations, and all other interested persons and groups to unite during this appointed time to reaffirm publicly our Nation's continuing commitment to control cancer.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:28 p.m., April 8, 1986]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on April 8.

Proclamation 5456 -- National Organ and Tissue Donor Awareness Week, 1986

April 7, 1986

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Today, many Americans are working, attending school, caring for families, or resuming normal life in their communities after receiving a transplanted organ or other tissue. But many others still wait for such transplants in order to improve or even save their lives.

The need for donors far surpasses the supply. Current medical technology enables the transplantation of organs and tissues including kidney, heart, heart-lung, lung, liver, pancreas, skin, cornea, bone, and bone marrow. But the greatest obstacle to making these life-sustaining and life-saving transplants possible is the shortage of donors.

All Americans must know what they can do to consent to become organ and tissue donors. By completing a uniform donor card and carrying it at all times, anyone can give the gift of life to people in desperate need of organs and tissues for transplantation. It is especially important for would-be donors to make their intentions known to family members, so that appropriate action can be taken promptly when the time comes.

Americans are a caring and giving people, so it is fitting that we as a Nation should encourage organ and tissue donation and increase public awareness of the possibilities and the need. I ask every American to consider organ and tissue donation, and I ask the media to assist in informing the public of the great need that exists. Together, we can make organ and tissue donation another expression of American generosity.

The Congress, by Public Law 99 - 203, has designated the week beginning April 20 through April 26, 1986, as ``National Organ and Tissue Donor Awareness Week'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this occasion.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim April 20 through April 26, 1986, as National Organ and Tissue Donor Awareness Week. I urge all health care professionals, educators, the media, public and private organizations, and all Americans to join me in promoting greater and more widespread awareness and acceptance of this humanitarian practice.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:29 p.m., April 8, 1986]

Note: The proclamation was released by the Office of the Press Secretary on April 8.