Proclamations, April 11, 1986

Proclamation 5464 -- National School Library Month, 1986

April 22, 1986

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

The accumulation of information, the acquisition of knowledge, and the application of that knowledge to solve problems or enhance life are principal functions of American education. At every level, school libraries offer a great range of resource materials that greatly enrich education and increase the knowledge and understanding of all Americans.

Young people often develop a lifelong love of reading because of their exposure to books in school libraries. Furthermore, researchers are often motivated by the vast resources of university and special libraries as they dedicate themselves to studying the problems of society. School libraries and their dedicated staffs make an incalculable contribution to our educational system.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 52, has designated the month of April 1986 as ``National School Library Month'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this occasion.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the month of April 1986 as National School Library Month. I invite the Governors of every State, principals, teachers, educators, students, parents, and all Americans to observe this month with appropriate activities to heighten the awareness of the importance of school libraries.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 2:40 p.m., April 22, 1986]

Proclamation 5465 -- Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week, 1986

April 22, 1986

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Americans who have come from Asian and Pacific countries have made notable contributions to our Nation in a wide range of fields, including science, the arts, medicine, law, literature, agriculture, industry, commerce, and government. Through the rich and varied traditions and heritages of their homelands, they have greatly enhanced America's culture and the lives of all Americans.

This Nation fittingly honors its citizens of Asian and Pacific descent. They have brought to our country an industriousness that boosts our economy and a passion for freedom that rejuvenates American ideals. We are grateful to Asian and Pacific Americans for their unwavering support for the unalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness that form the core of the American ethos. Through their bravery and perseverance, they have provided us with a moving testament to the universality of the human thirst for political freedom.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim the week beginning May 4, 1986, as Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week, and call upon all people of the United States to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 2:41 p.m., April 22, 1986]

Proclamation 5466 -- Mother's Day, 1986

April 22, 1986

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

By tradition, the second Sunday in May is designated as Mother's Day, one of America's best-loved holidays. It gives us all a special occasion to honor our own, and to praise the unique dignity of motherhood, one of life's highest callings.

Thomas Jefferson called motherhood ``the keystone of the arch of matrimonial happiness,'' and we must always remember that with love, strength, and fortitude, the American mother assisted in the settlement, development, and prosperity of our country. Her contributions to the well-being of the family, the community, and the Nation are beyond all reckoning. A Jewish saying sums it up: ``God could not be everywhere -- so He created mothers.''

The role of the mother has changed constantly in our society, but its fundamental meaning abides: love and caring. The modern mother is conquering new worlds. She continues to be the heart of the family and the hearth of the home. Where mothers are honored and loved, the family is strong. And where the family is strong the nation is strong.

In recognition of the magnificent contributions of mothers to their families and to the Nation, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May of each year as Mother's Day and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 11, 1986, be observed as Mother's Day. I urge all Americans to express their love and honor to their mothers and to reflect on the importance of motherhood to the well-being of our country. I direct Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 2:42 p.m., April 22, 1986]

Proclamation 5467 -- Father's Day, 1986

April 22, 1986

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Each year the third Sunday in June is designated as Father's Day, a day on which we honor our Nation's fathers for everything they do for their families and for America.

Today fatherhood is sometimes drily described as a craft or an occupation, something which competes with career or outside pursuits for time and attention. Contemporary books and articles offer reams of advice to mothers and fathers on how to improve as parents and better manage their time at home and with their children. In this era of new demands and stresses on families, we frequently forget just what it is that is special about fatherhood, what makes it not a part of life, but a path in life that has, in every generation, the power to create and renew.

Fatherhood, after all, is about childhood. Fatherhood is walking the floor at midnight with a sick baby that cannot sleep; fatherhood is an arm around the shoulders of a child crying because a balloon is lost; fatherhood is repairing a bicycle wheel for the umpteenth time knowing that it won't last more than the afternoon. Fatherhood is guiding a youth through the wilderness of adolescence toward the vast expanse of adulthood; fatherhood is holding tight when all else seems to be falling apart; and fatherhood is letting go when it is time to part. Fatherhood is long hours at the blast furnace or in the fields, behind the wheel or in front of a computer screen, working a twelve-hour shift or doing a six-month tour of duty. In short, fatherhood is giving one's all, from a child's first day of life on, from the break of day to its end -- on the job, in the household, but, most of all, in the heart.

From the vantage point of his love and responsibility, a father sees the future and dedicates himself to doing whatever is necessary to bring his family safely through. No father performs any of these tasks with thought of thanks or reward. The things that gratify him most are those that represent success in what he has labored to impart to his children: strength of character and conviction, love of family and country, a sense of right and wrong, and, above all, a spirit of thanksgiving for the generous gift of life itself.

Because human nature often keeps us from recognizing how great another's sacrifice is until we assume similar burdens, many of us realize for the first time how dearly we were prized only when we ourselves become parents. On this day for fathers, all of us have a special opportunity to say thanks to America's dads for their selflessness and devotion. We also have a chance to say a prayer for fathers everywhere -- for their health and strength if they are with us, or for their blessing if this day finds them smiling down from heaven's bright corridors. Truly, for the labor and legacy of our families and our freedoms, we cannot thank them enough.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, in accordance with a joint resolution of the Congress approved December 28, 1970 (36 U.S.C. 142a), do hereby proclaim Sunday, June 15, 1986, as Father's Day. I invite the States and communities and the people of the United States to observe that day with appropriate ceremonies as a mark of appreciation and abiding affection for their fathers. I direct government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal government buildings, and I urge all Americans to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 2:43 p.m., April 22, 1986]