Proclamations, May 15, 1986

Proclamation 5478 -- Imposition of Quantitative Restrictions on Imports of Certain Articles From the European Economic Community

May 15, 1986

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

1. On March 31, 1986, I announced my decision to take action in response to restrictions imposed by the European Economic Community (EEC) affecting imports of United States grain and oilseeds into Spain and Portugal, following the expansion of the EEC to include those two countries. I have determined, pursuant to Section 301(a) of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (the Act) (19 U.S.C. 2411(a)), that these restrictions deny benefits to the United States arising under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) (61 Stat. (pts. 5 and 6)), are unreasonable, and constitute a burden and restriction on United States commerce.

2. Section 301(a) of the Act (19 U.S.C. 2411(a)) authorizes the President to take all appropriate and feasible action to obtain the elimination of an act, policy, or practice of a foreign government or instrumentality that 1) is inconsistent with the provisions of, or otherwise denies benefits to the United States under, any trade agreement; or 2) is unjustifiable, unreasonable, or discriminatory and burdens or restricts United States commerce. Section 301(b) of the Act (19 U.S.C. 2411(b)) also authorizes the President to suspend, withdraw, or prevent the application of benefits of trade agreement concessions with respect to, and to impose duties or other import restrictions on the products of, such foreign government or instrumentality. Pursuant to Section 301(a) of the Act, any such actions can be taken on a discriminatory basis solely against the foreign government or instrumentality involved. Section 301(d)(1) of the Act (19 U.S.C. 2411(d)(1)) authorizes the President to take action on his own motion.

3. In response to the EEC imposition of illegal restrictions on Portuguese imports of grain, oilseeds, and oilseed products, I have decided that expeditious action is required, and, pursuant to Section 301(a), (b), and (d)(1) of the Act, to impose quantitative restrictions on the articles provided for in Annex I to this proclamation that are the product of the EEC.

4. In response to the withdrawal of tariff concessions and the application of the EEC variable levy on Spanish imports of corn and sorghum, I have further decided, pursuant to Section 301(a), (b), and (d)(1) of the Act, to take steps to suspend temporarily the tariff concessions made by the United States under the GATT on articles described in Annex II to this proclamation, but to make no immediate change in the rates of duty for these articles set forth in Rate of Duty Column 1 of the Tariff Schedules of the United States (TSUS). If by July 1, 1986, the EEC provides adequate compensation for the imposition of variable levies on imports of corn and sorghum into Spain, or if it is determined that other circumstances so warrant, I am authorizing the United States Trade Representative (USTR) to terminate any of these suspensions as appropriate. If such compensation is not provided, I will proclaim increased duties on these articles as appropriate. Having due regard for the international obligations of the United States, particularly paragraph 3 of Article XXVIII of the GATT requiring any suspension of trade agreement concessions to be made on a most-favored-nation basis, any duty increase on these articles will be made on a most-favored-nation basis.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the statutes of the United States, including but not limited to Section 301(a), (b), and (d)(1) and Section 604 of the Act (19 U.S.C. 2483), do proclaim that:

1. Subpart B of part 2 of the Appendix to the Tariff Schedules of the United States is modified as provided in Annex I to this proclamation. These changes shall be effective with respect to articles entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after May 19, 1986.

2. The tariff concessions under the GATT on articles listed in Annex II to this proclamation are suspended, effective on the thirty-first day following notification to the Contracting Parties to the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, and Part I of Schedule XX of the GATT is modified to conform to this action. The rates of duty for these articles set forth in the Rate of Duty Column 1 of the TSUS are not affected by this action and shall remain as previously proclaimed until such time as they are expressly modified.

3. The USTR is hereby authorized to suspend, modify, or terminate the quantitative restrictions on any of the articles covered by Annex I to this proclamation, and to terminate the suspension of the tariff concessions under the GATT on any of the articles covered by Annex II upon the publication in the Federal Register of his determination that such suspension, modification, or termination is justified by actions taken by the EEC with respect to this matter or is otherwise appropriate, taking into account the interests of the United States.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:47 a.m., May 15, 1986]

Note: The annexes to the proclamation were printed in the ``Federal Register'' of May 16.

Proclamation 5479 -- Jewish Heritage Week, 1986

May 15, 1986

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

American Jews have made immeasurable contributions to our country's economic, political, social, and cultural development. The remarkable and varied achievements of American Jews have greatly enriched the lives of all Americans, from medicine and mathematics to movies and the musical theater.

It is appropriate at this time of year that we remind ourselves of the tragedy and glory of Jewish history. The Jewish people have recently celebrated Passover, the holiday that commemorates their deliverance by God from the bondage of Egypt to freedom in the Holy Land. Last week marked the observance of Yom Hashoa, the Day of Remembrance, and this week, Israeli Independence Day is celebrated. These events remind us that Israel was reborn out of ashes of the Holocaust. These commemorations sustain our hope that someday the persecuted Jews of the Soviet Union will be delivered from bondage.

At this time of year, it is appropriate for all Americans to acknowledge how much our country has benefited from the contributions of American Jews. We should be proud that Jews in America have always been free to practice their religion and preserve their traditions. And the Jewish people have responded with an ardent patriotism once so eloquently expressed by one of America's foremost rabbis:

``God built Him a continent of glory and filled it with treasures untold. . . . Then He called unto a thousand peoples, and summoned the bravest among them. . . . And out of the bounty of earth and the labor of men, out of the longing of hearts and the prayers of souls, out of the memory of ages and the hopes of the world, God fashioned a nation in love, blessed it with a purpose sublime, and called it -- America!''

Silver, ``America,'' 1917.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 275, has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation designating the week of May 11, 1986, through May 17, 1986, as ``Jewish Heritage Week.''

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of May 11, 1986, through May 17, 1986, as Jewish Heritage Week. I call upon the people of the United States to observe this week with appropriate programs and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth day of May, in the year of Our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 9:05 a.m., May 16, 1986]

Proclamation 5480 -- National Defense Transportation Day and National Transportation Week, 1986

May 15, 1986

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Our Nation was founded on beliefs in basic human freedoms. Among these cherished freedoms is free movement of people and ideas. In exercising that freedom, Americans have developed the greatest transportation system the world has ever known. We can travel where and when we want, either by air, water, or land. We can move goods by airplane, railroad, ship, barge, and truck. This ability to travel and to ship goods is as important to our Nation's strength today as it was vital for the pioneers who settled this great Republic.

The first Federal highway built with national funds, the Cumberland Road, was begun in 1811. A century later, when the Lincoln Highway opened to traffic in 1913, we had our first paved coast-to-coast road. Between now and 1990, we will complete funding for our greatest highway project yet, the Interstate Highway System. Great progress has already been made, and when it is finished, the Nation will be linked together with 42,500 miles of unbroken, limited-access roadway. This is the equivalent of circling the world almost twice without hitting a traffic light -- an achievement that benefits not only business and pleasure travel, but greatly strengthens our national defense as well.

In a few months, we will be celebrating the 100th birthday of our great symbol of freedom, the Statue of Liberty. This magnificent lady watched as millions of people streamed across the Atlantic to our shores in pursuit of a dream -- a land of opportunity, a country where people were free to go as far as their abilities could take them. Many of these immigrants became involved in designing and building our highways, bridges, railways, and airports. Their sons and daughters are working on new challenges, high-speed railways, hypersonic flight, and new technologies to make all travel safer. What the future will bring we can only guess, but improvement in the swiftness, safety, dependability, and economy of transportation will be an integral part of even greater prosperity and human fulfillment.

In recognition of the importance of transportation, and to honor the millions of Americans who serve and supply our transportation needs, the Congress, by joint resolution approved May 16, 1957 (36 U.S.C. 160), has requested that the third Friday in May of each year be designated as National Defense Transportation Day; and by joint resolution approved May 14, 1962 (36 U.S.C. 166), that the week in which that Friday falls be proclaimed National Transportation Week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Friday, May 16, 1986, as National Defense Transportation Day and the week beginning May 11, 1986, through May 17, 1986, as National Transportation Week. I urge the people of the United States to observe these occasions with appropriate ceremonies that will give full recognition to the importance of our transportation system to this country.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 9:06 a.m., May 16, 1986]