Proclamations, May 21, 1986

Proclamation 5486 -- Better Hearing and Speech Month, 1986

May 21, 1986

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Sounds, whether we produce them or receive them, are an integral part of our lives. Musical sounds bring us a whole range of delight. Much of our knowledge of the world around us we learn through sounds: conversations allow us to gather and convey information, to question and to receive answers; ringing fire alarms warn us to clear a burning building. Sounds -- both the ones we hear and the ones we make -- help us to understand others and be understood.

More than fifteen million Americans strive daily to surmount the isolation that hearing impairment so often brings. Over ten million Americans endeavor to communicate despite speech disorders. We can help people with communicative disorders fulfill their potential by identifying and removing the man-made obstacles that limit their educational and occupational opportunities. Our efforts will enrich not only their lives, but our own.

Today, in medical institutions across the country, scientists supported by the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and by numerous voluntary health agencies are carrying out a wide range of research to find better ways to prevent, treat, and cure hearing and speech disorders. Investigators have discovered much about the structure and function of the systems involved in hearing and speech. They have developed new devices and medications that offer hope where before there was none. Still, much remains to be learned.

To heighten public awareness of hearing and speech disorders, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 284, has designated the month of May 1986 as ``Better Hearing and Speech Month'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this month.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the month of May 1986 as Better Hearing and Speech Month, and I call upon the people of the United States to observe this month with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-first day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:19 a.m., May 22, 1986]

Proclamation 5487 -- National Tourism Week, 1986

May 21, 1986

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Tourism is vital to the United States. It contributes significantly to our economic prosperity. It creates jobs and helps out on our balance of payments. Most of all, it creates better understanding of this Nation's social and cultural realities, including our history.

People are central to the travel industry. It supports, directly or indirectly, almost 7 million jobs. Travel and tourism have grown substantially over the years. The industry now generates business receipts of approximately $260 billion annually. Payroll income alone is $60 billion, and tax revenue is $33 billion. Indeed, international tourism now ranks as this Nation's largest business ``export'' in the service industries.

This Nation is blessed with a magnificent and varied array of tourist attractions: our extraordinarily diversified landscape, and some of the world's most vibrant cities, cultural attractions, and natural wonders. Nowhere else but in America can you find such beautiful coastlines and beaches, majestic mountains, lush valleys, rugged woods, rolling plains, awesome canyons, scenic deserts, tropical islands, and Arctic snowscapes. No wonder the world wants to come and see where we live. Let us welcome them and treat them as honored guests.

In recognition of the many educational, economic, and recreational benefits of tourism to the people of this country, the Congress, by Public Law 99 - 98, has designated the week beginning May 18 through May 24, 1986, as ``National Tourism Week'' and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this event.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning May 18 through May 24, 1986, as National Tourism Week, and I call upon the people of the United States to observe such week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-first day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:20 a.m., May 22, 1986]

Proclamation 5488 -- Older Americans Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Week, 1986

May 21, 1986

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer, and its incidence is rising. Fortunately, it is also the most preventable form of cancer and the easiest to detect early and treat successfully. The risk of developing skin cancer increases throughout adult life, with the highest incidence occurring among people over 50.

There are two basic types of skin cancer: the common basal cell and squamous cell cancers, and the less common but far more serious type called melanoma. More than 400,000 new cases of nonmelanoma skin cancer are diagnosed in the United States each year. These cancers have a high cure rate, especially with early detection and prompt treatment. Most can be treated in the doctor's office.

Occurrence of nonmelanoma skin cancers varies directly with exposure to ultraviolet light from the sun (and ``sun lamps'' of various kinds), and indirectly with skin pigmentation. Older Americans can reduce their risk of skin cancer by avoiding excessive exposure to sunlight, particularly if they are fair-skinned; by avoiding exposure during the 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. hours; by wearing protective clothing; and by using sunscreen lotions and ointments. Prudent avoidance of too much sunlight is fully compatible with enjoyment of the great outdoors.

Older Americans may mistake the signs of skin cancer for normal skin changes due to aging, and they should be alert to these signs. Many skin growths are noncancerous, but any new growth on the skin, or a sore that does not heal, should promptly be brought to a doctor's attention. Skin cancer has many different appearances, but it occurs most frequently on sun-exposed areas of the body.

Melanoma is a far more serious health problem, but it also is highly curable when detected and treated early. About 23,000 new cases will be diagnosed this year. Melanoma is also related to exposure to ultraviolet light but not as directly as nonmelanoma skin cancers. Older Americans should be alert for changes in the size or color of a mole or rapid darkening, ulceration or scaliness or changes in the shape or outline of a mole, or development of a new pigmented lesion or bulge in a normal skin area. These are some of the most common signs that may signal melanoma, and a doctor should be consulted without delay.

The American Academy of Dermatology and other dermatologic organizations are committed to educating the public about all types of skin cancers. This year marks the Second Annual National Melanoma and Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Program, a coordinated national effort of professional dermatologic organizations to reduce the increasing incidence of skin cancers and to better control these cancers by prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 267, has designated the week of May 26 through June 1, 1986, as ``Older Americans Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Week'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this week.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of May 26 through June 1, 1986, as Older Americans Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Week, and I invite all Americans to observe the week with appropriate programs and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-first day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:21 a.m., May 22, 1986]

Proclamation 5489 -- National Farm Safety Week, 1986

May 21, 1986

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

Our remarkable agricultural system has enabled our Nation to make great strides in efforts to conquer hunger and to meet the food and fiber needs of our people as well as countless others around the world. But we cannot afford to let up in the battle against accidental injuries and illnesses that take an unduly high toll of those whose toil is responsible for this abundance.

Each year, many thousands of farm and ranch residents and workers are seriously or fatally injured at work, in the home, during recreation, and in traffic accidents.

Although much has been accomplished over the years to make farm life safer and healthier, much more remains to be done. Everyone in the agricultural community should make renewed efforts to be informed about potential hazards and take steps to minimize those dangers. This includes the conscientious use of mechanical safeguards like protective equipment and safety belts. I commend our farm equipment manufacturers for their emphasis on building safeguards into their equipment and warning of possible hazards in operational misuse, but there is no substitute for vigilance and common sense in using equipment. Awareness, on the job and off, is the surest way to avert mishaps and tragedies.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week of September 21 through September 27, 1986, as National Farm Safety Week. I urge all those who live and work on farms or ranches to take necessary precautions to protect their safety and health -- on the job and off. I also urge leaders in the agricultural community to bolster safety and health efforts in your area by example and by educational programs. I encourage all Americans to participate in appropriate events and activities in observance of National Farm Safety Week.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-first day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

Ronald Reagan

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:06 p.m., May 22, 1986]